Thompson Library to Host Summer 2015 — Holocaust and Genocide Workshop — at UM-Flint


 Workshop on Holocaust and Rwanda Genocide Testimonies Returns to UM-Flint this Summer


July 13th through July 17th this summer, UM-Flint will once again offer a unique Holocaust Workshop on our campus.

MSU Professor Kenneth Waltzer.
Dr. Kenneth Waltzer, past Winegarden Visiting Professor at UM-Flint and Professor Emeritus and former Director of Jewish Studies at MSU

Presenting again this year will be Dr Kenneth Waltzer, a past Winegarden Visiting Professor at UM-Flint and Professor Emeritus and former Director of Jewish Studies at MSU and our own  Dr Theodosia Robertson, Associate Professor Emerita of History.     Joining them this you will be Dr Dauda Abubakar, Assistant Professor of Africana Studies and Political Science, also of UM-Flint.

 

T Robertson
Dr. Theodosia (Teddy) Robertson, UM-Flint History Dept Associate Professor, Emeritus.

Attendees will include local and visiting educators, graduate students, and community members interested in studying or teaching genocide materials. Participants may choose the three-day secondary educator track or the five-day intensive research track. SCECH credits are available for teachers.  Attendance at the workshop conveys 20 continuing education credits (20 CE) to all participants.

 

 

 

Dr. Dauda Abubakar Africana Studies Assistant Professor
Dr. Dauda Abubakar
Africana Studies
Assistant Professor

Thompson Library is proud to support the annual workshop presentations through our library resources, and in particular through our access to the  Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive.

 

 

 

 

Per a recent post in the College of Arts & Sciences blog:

Much of the workshop will focus on UM-Flint’s access to the USC Shoah Foundation‘s database of audio and visual testimonies from survivors and witnesses of genocides. Over 52,000 video testimonies of the Holocaust alone are housed within the database.

According to Emily Newberry, Web Services Coordinator and Reference Librarian at the Thompson Library, “We are one of the few institutions in the world who subscribe to the Shoah Visual History Archive through our subscription with Ann Arbor.

Participants will have full access while they are here, to use the archive and learn how to use testimonies with the full database.   After they leave, they may either come back and use it as a guest, or they can access a subset of freely available videos called VHA Online.  Secondary educators have access to an educational module tool called  iWitness, which also uses this free subset of videos in a format where they are included within modules for classroom use.”

Emily Newberry, Associate Librarian, Thompson Library, University of Michigan-Flint.
Emily Newberry, Associate Librarian, Thompson Library, University of Michigan-Flint.

As always, Emily is available to help anyone who would like to use these resources from our library.

We would like to thank the CAS bloggers for their support of this program, and for including mention of the Thompson Library participation.

To read the complete blog post, see the  University of Michigan-Flint, College of Arts & Sciences blog, or click here:  CAS article

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For more information, or to register for the workshop, visit the Summer Workshop website. If you have questions, email ENewberr@umflint.edu or call (810) 424-5302.

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 (Click any image to enlarge)
Auschwitz Museum, Glasses of victims.  Photo taken at the museum 28 July 2010 by DIMSFIKAS and used under Creative Commons license.
Auschwitz Museum, Glasses of victims. Photo taken at the museum 28 July 2010 by DIMSFIKAS and used under Creative Commons license.
Eyeglasses taken from prisoners at Auschwitz concentration camp.  From the collection of Yad Vashem photo archive.
Heaps of eyeglasses taken from gassed inmates at Auschwitz concentration camp. From the collection of Yad Vashem photo archive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Georg Wippern statement to the Court, after the Second World War, confirmed his role in the economic plunder of Jewish valuables:

“In this context I want to mention that in the beginning I had nothing to do with jewellery and valuables. But then I was asked to come to Pohl in Berlin, who from then on put me in charge for the registration and delivery of valuables and jewellery. On this occasion I learned they that they were Jewish property. Because of that I wanted to refuse handling this task, but finally in a fierce battle of words was referred by Pohl to the Bruning Emergency decree from the year 1932.

According to the Heinrich Bruning Emergency Decree where there was given an order that non-registered foreign currency and precious metal were due for confiscation. Enforcement of this law was an obligation of the Reich’s finance authorities.

 At this meeting I heard for the first time the name Wirth. Because Wirth initially delivered the confiscated jewellery and valuables in a disorderly condition at the Reichsbank in Berlin, now this work should be done by me, nothing but as a purely administration specialist

 In this context I refer to the statements which I made at the Public Prosecutors Office in Hamburg. According to this, Wirth was obliged to deliver the valuables to me. This way I came to know Wirth. I want to emphasise that those jewels and valuables delivered to me not only came from the extermination camps but also from SS and Police Leaders in Warsaw and other places.”

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Original caption states: "Deep gashes delivered by the killers are visible in the skulls that fill one room at the Murambi School." Aftermath of Rwandan Genocide.
Original caption states: “Deep gashes delivered by the killers are visible in the skulls that fill one room at the Murambi School.” Aftermath of Rwandan Genocide.

Photo taken during the official visit of US Rep. Frank Wolf.

This United States Congress image is in the public domain. This may be because it is an official Congressional portrait, because it was taken by an employee of the Congress as part of that person’s official duties, or because it has been released into the public domain and posted on the official websites of a member of Congress. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Knives, machetes and spears used against the Tutsi people during the Rwanda war of genocide in 1994.  The Rwanda Genocide intensified in 1994 with the Hutu tribes hunting down the members of the Tutsi tribe who had ruled the rival Hutus for centuries as feudal overlords.  Photo used through Creative Commons license.
Knives, machetes and spears used against the Tutsi people during the Rwanda war of genocide in 1994. The Rwanda Genocide intensified in 1994 with the Hutu tribes hunting down the members of the Tutsi tribe who had ruled the rival Hutus for centuries as feudal overlords. Photo used through Creative Commons license.
Skulls of victims from the Rwandan Genocide found at the Nyamata Memorial.   By The Dilly Lama and used under Creative Commons license.
Skulls of victims from the Rwandan Genocide found at the Nyamata Memorial.
By The Dilly Lama and used under Creative Commons license.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See Tweet from CAS about the upcoming Workshop:

 



 

Pilot Project — 2 AM Closing at Library


2 am Closing Pilot Project — Winter 2015


 

During the winter semester of 2015, Thompson Library (in conjunction with Student Life) ran a trial of later closing hours to determine the user demand and cost effectiveness of remaining open until 2 am.

The library was open until 2 am for a total of 56 days during the Winter 2015 semester.

The 2 am closing would add 8 additional hours per week to our standard 92 hours of operation, taking us to a total of 100 hours per week.

During this period, we did not add new personnel.  This put considerable hardship on our current staff.   However, the project was intended only to determine demand at this time.    Sufficient demand for library operations extending to 2 am permanently would lead the library to implement phase two; hiring new personnel to cover the additional operational hours.

Detailed statistics of building usage were kept throughout the trial period, both by date and by hour.  Therefore, we now have records of numbers of people in the building at various hours of the day and on various days of the week.

As is usual for the library, during the week before final exams (known as Study Week) the library remained open 24 hours (Monday – Thursday), closing finally at 8 pm on Friday of Study Week.

As would be assumed, the statistics for the special 24 hour period were statistically very different from the usage statistics for the overall semester, and were therefore NOT included in this project.

In general, while some students did choose to come to the library between midnight and 2 am, the study did not show a continuing or increasing number of students in the building after the standard closing time of 12 midnight during the trial period.  That is to say, the usage from midnight to 2 am was insignificant compared to our overall operation statistics.

Average usage figures for the entire semester did turn up some interesting statistics.  We will provide the simple count numbers within this article and offer links to the full study documentation for those who would like to see the detailed numbers gathered in this study.

 

Interesting facts gleaned from the study:

 

  • The largest number of students using the library in the evenings were in the building  at 10 pm.   (Median number for semester:  37 people.)

 

  • The least number of students using the library in the evenings were counted at 1 am (Median number for semester:  7 people.)

 

  • Maximum number of people in the building were here in the evenings at 10 pm during semester:   90 people.

 

  • Least number of people in building were at 12 am and 1 am during semester:   0 people.

 

  • Most usage during evenings in the winter semester were on Monday evenings at 10 pm.

 

  • Least usage during evenings in the winter semester were on Thursday evenings at 1 am.

 

  • Maximum usage for evenings at 10 pm (Monday through Thursday) was 90 people, with the  minimum usage at 7 people.

 

  • Maximum usage for evenings at 1 am (Monday through Thursday) was 30 people, with the minimum at 0 people.

 

  • Highest usage of the building across the board (time-wise) was on Monday evenings.

 

  • Lowest usage of the building across the board (time-wise) was on Thursday evening.

 

  • Fridays the library closed at 6 pm as was standard throughout the year; usage during Fridays was not affected by this trial project.

 

  • Interestingly, the second half of the semester (March & April)  saw higher usage statistics than the first half of the semester (January & February).  Correlations could be drawn between students learning how to use the library (through instructional sessions, instructions from the teachers, help from friends or basic trial-and-error) during the first half of the semester and actually using library resources productively for course work during the later half — but we have no concrete or statistical evidence to that effect, leaving such supposition in the realm of anecdotal evidence at this time.

 

  • Our data excluded both the “24 Hour Library Study Week,” and Spring Break week which would have skewed our data with both abnormal increases and decreases of statistical imbalances.

 

  • All maximum daily statistics were set either on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 (the second Study Day) or on Thursday, April 23, 2015 (the first day of Final Exams), again anecdotally consistent with student use of the library.

 

As the graph demonstrates (see brief below), usage rose steadily and sometimes steeply each week of the semester for the 10 pm time period and — to a lesser degree — for the 11 pm time period, but rose at a much more level curve for the other time periods.  The curve is far more erratic for the 11 pm and 1 am time periods, with both steep jumps up and sudden plunges downward in total building usage over the semester.

The one constant seems to be that the greatest building usage for late evenings occurs at 10 pm, with the number of people in the building dropping steadily and steeply after that time.  On several days throughout the semester, there were no students in the building at all from midnight to 2 am, and on a few occasions only 2 people in the building between 11 pm and midnight.

Our staff is to be commended for the effort they put into making this study a success.  Their diligence in gathering statistics (as well as making students feel welcome in our facility during the late hours) has been noteworthy.

This study has not been the first or only attempt by the library to determine our optimum operational hours.  Over the past 10 years, the library has  increased its hours of operation  from 67 hours per week to the current 92 hours per week based on usage stats obtained through previous studies.

However, the inevitable conclusion of this study is that the demand for use of the library facility peeks at 10 pm and declines rapidly thereafter, with insufficient usage after midnight to warrant continuing this trial or expanding current hours of operation.

Therefore, library hours of operation for the upcoming fall/winter semesters will remain with  Monday through Thursday opening at 8 am and closing at midnight.

For further reading, the library has posted both the brief statistical synopsis of this study and the full report of the project in .pdf’s available from the library through the links below .

Satistical synopsis document.

Full Report of the 2 am Pilot Project Study.

 



 

New Books Arrive at Thompson Library


NEW   LIBRARY   BOOKS  ARRIVE!


 

Books ordered during the 2014 – 2015 period are beginning to show up on the New Book Shelf.

Items will remain on the New Book Shelf for approximately 2 months unless checked out by someone.  (Returned items are all sent to their final location in the Main Collection.)

The New Book Shelf is located on the 3rd floor of Thompson Library, on the shelves between the Reference Librarian Desk and the back wall.  They are VERY easy to find.

But — as always — if you need help, just ask.   Reference Librarians are there to answer your questions, from help learning how to use any of our resources, to finding where materials can be accessed on our website, to good old fashion directions within our building.

And hey, all of our Reference Librarians are very friendly, too.   Ask one for help sometime and see them in action.

Librarians.  The Super Heroes of the Information Age!

 

photo 1 photo 2 photo 3 photo 4Click any photo

to enlarge.