Tag Archives: #librarybooks

“Where’s Your Fiction?”

 


Just want to kick back and read a good book this weekend?

THOMPSON  LIBRARY  CAN  HELP!


 

Student, faculty, or staff — you are part of the University of Michigan.  You stand among the Leaders and the Best.   You hold yourself to a higher standard.  You are a scholar in the best sense of that word.   You regularly use the library to research topics.  You do your due diligence — digging for facts and verifying your data.

But every now and then, you’d just like to escape into another place, a place populated with cowboys, Jedi warriors, dashing and romantic heroes, colorful pirates, brilliant compassionate doctors or mysterious strangers.

You know the UM library is a great source for facts, figures and academic articles.  But this weekend, you just want a fun read to kick back with, something that will let you get away from the stress of higher education and slip into an exciting world far from your daily existence.  A little creative escapism.

You just want a good book to read over the weekend ...

Good news!   We CAN help!

That’s right.

Thompson Library actually has some great reads, good books just for you to  jump in and enjoy as plain old escapist reading.

Where can you find a fun read in the library?

LOTS of places!

Where exactly will depend largely on what type of item you want.

 

MAIN  COLLECTION:

For instance on the first floor of the library (near the windows in the Atrium), books indexed in the call number “PS” section contain our collection of literature.

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It’s a vast and varied collection ranging from the great classics to works of fiction in nearly every genre imaginable.

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There are even several fiction paperbacks that are included in the literature section of  the Main Collection, PS call number section.

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FIND  a  BOOK  in the MAIN COLLECTION by  TITLE  or  AUTHOR:

MIRLYLN online catalog — search page — click to enlarge

Check the MIRLYN library catalog online for your favorite author — or even for a title you’d like to read.  It may already be in the PS section of the library collection.  Find the call number and locate the book on shelf.  Use your UMID to check it out.

 

MIRLYN online catalog — Results page — click to enlarge

 

 

That’s right.

The library will loan you — for free! — good books to enjoy reading  just for fun.

 

 

PAPERBACK  BOOKS:

Speaking of paperback books, did you know that Thompson Library has an extensive collection of paperback books, just for the purpose of finding a good read for a quiet afternoon (or before bedtime)?

The Paperback collection is located on the  1st floor near the Oversized Books and Microfilm cabinets.

Paperback Collection Shelves — 1st floor — click to enlarge

 

They’re directly in front of the elevator when you step off on the 1st floor.  Just keep walking past the row of Oversized books and you’ll find a reader’s delight of paperbacks.

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Paperbacks are organized by genre, so whether you like         Science FictionFantasyRomance, Mystery,    Suspense or Historical Fiction,  you’re likely to find something you’ll enjoy reading.

The Paperback collection is not cataloged in MIRLYN, so it’s “browse the shelves,” only to locate a book you’d like to borrow.  But they’re easily scanned with titles clearly visible on the spine of the books  — and we have many to choose from on the shelves.

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Any book on the Paperback Collection shelves can be checked out for 3 weeks, with the option to renew for an additional 3 weeks.

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CURRENTLY POPULAR “BEST SELLER LIST” BOOKS:

 

Or perhaps you want to read a book that is currently (or was recently) on the Best Seller’s list?

Browsing Collection — FICTION (click to enlarge)

 

Our Browsing Collection should help you out!  It contains best sellers of a variety of genres.

Browsing Collection — NON-FICTION (click to enlarge)

Located on the 3rd floor (near the Circulation Desk and close to the entrance to the Library), the shelves of the Browsing Collection have books from best seller’s lists in fiction, books of local interest (including books written by local authors) and best selling books on non-fiction.

 

 

CHILDREN’S  BOOKS:

We even have an extensive collection of Children’s Literature in our library which you may borrow.

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Children’s Literature Collection — click to enlarge

We maintain a quality collection of children’s books for use and education of our future elementary school teachers currently attending our School of Education — but any student, staff or faculty from UM-Flint can check them out.

Children’s Literature Collection — click to enlarge

So if you want a good read for the children in your family, we can help with those books, too.

All items within the children’s literature genre are indexed and searchable in the MIRLYN online library catalog.

Find the call number in MIRLYN and — if you need help — ask one of our Reference Librarians to assist you in locating the book on shelf.

 

MOVIES & MUSIC:

 

VIDEOS

For those who prefer to watch movies rather than read, we have a nice little collection of popular films in several formats, from VHS to DVD to BlueRay to streaming online via subscription service databases

ALEXANDER STREET PRESS      and       KANOPY.

(See list of databases on Thompson Library website to access any of these resources — authentication with UM-Flint credentials required to view any subscription item online.)

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Any item the library owns — including videos and music — can be found by using the MIRLYN library catalog online.  Want to limit results to ONLY videos and music?  Switching the drop-down box for our various collections to limit results to “Media.”

MIRLYN will provide the call number, which can be given to the clerks at the Circulation Desk (where you check out books) to retrieve.  Note that all media items have a 1 week check out loan period.

 

MUSIC

Want to listen to some music?   We have that, too!

We have an extensive collection of music from classical to swing to rock to jazz — historic or contemporary, we have it!

The music CD collection is near the video collection, and as with everything else in the library, can be found using the library catalog.

Music CD Collection — click to enlarge

 

NEED HELP?

Having trouble finding something that interests you?

Ask a Reference Librarian for help.

They can help you find anything we have in the library and beyond,  and will probably be happy to discuss their favorite books or videos with you.

Reference Librarians like to read for fun, too!

Reference Desk — Thompson Library — University of Michigan-Flint (click to enlarge)

 

No matter what you enjoy reading or viewing, whether doing scholarly research, or just want something to kick back with for a leisurely afternoon, you’ll find it at Thompson Library.



Best -Seller Books Available in Library Browsing Collection

Wow!   Books you can read  FOR  FUN !


When the stress of studying and upcoming finals gets to be too much, remember that the Thompson Library can help with more than your research needs.

We have ….   BOOKS !

Not just science, history or business books, but books that can take you away to another world where you can be an expert with a bow and arrow, or the greatest baseball pitcher in the world, or a magician trying to get your kingdom back, or a detective tracking down a terrorist, or a former President of the United States, or former First Lady, or a renowned television and movie comedian, or….

It’s up to YOU!   Hundreds of books to choose from.  Each will transport you to a world of the imagination.

And hey, as an added bonus, reading the works of great writers will improve your brain’s ability to learn, increase your vocabulary and hone your understanding of how to correctly and vividly express yourself in words.

All that by simply stopping by the library and perusing the Browsing Shelf  for a collection of best sellers.

Check out by campus UMID card.   One week loan period.  Renew loan once.

Located in Thompson Library, 3rd floor entrance (near Reference Desk).

Hurry!   Finals are approaching!   Your brain needs this!


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Book -- The Mighty Miss Malone

 

 

 

Book -- Mann -- 1493

 

 

 

Book -- Henry Kissinger -- World Order

Book -- James Patterson -- Hope to Die

 

 

 

 

Book -- Isaacson -- The Innovators

 

 

 

 

 

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Book -- Jimmy Carter -- A Call to Action

Book -- Collins -- Mokingjay

 

 

Book -- Michaels -- You Cant Make this Up

 

 

 

 

 

Book -- Roth -- DivergentBook -- Kathy Reichs -- Bones Never Lie

 

 

Book -- Roth -- Allegiant

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book -- John Cleese -- So Anyway

Book -- Mark Ridrych -- The Bird

 

 

 

Book -- Jim Abbott -- Imperfect

 

 

 

Book -- Elwes -- As You WishBook -- Gabaldon - Drums of Autumn

 

 

Book -- Fannie Flag -- All Girl Filling Station

 

 

 

Book --  Rowling -- Casual VacancyBook -- Cussler -- The Thief

 

 

 

 

 

Browsing Collection 2

 

 

 

 

 

 [Click any image to enlarge.] Browsing Collection NonFiction 1

Browsing Collection Fiction 2Browsilng Collection Local Interest 2Browsing Collection Fiction 1Browsing Collection 2Browsing Collection Local Interest 1Browsing Collection 3


“A book is a dream you hold in your hand.”  — Neil Gaiman

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“Neverland isn’t a place.  It’s a state of mind.”

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“A book which is left on a shelf is a dead thing.  But it is also a chrysalis; an inanimate object packed with the potential to burst into new life.”  — Susan Hill

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“At one magical instant in your early childhood, the page of a book — that string of confused alien ciphers — shivered into meaning.  Words spoke to you, gave up their secrets; at that moment, whole universes opened up.   You became, irrevocably, a reader.” — Alberto Manguel

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“Books are the perfect entertainment.  No commercials.  No batteries.  Hours of enjoyment for each dollar spent.  What I wonder is why everybody doesn’t carry a book around for those inevitable dead spots in life.”  — Stephen King

* * * * * * * * * *

 “The more you read, the more things you will know.  The more that you learn, the more places you will go.”  — Dr Suess

* * * * * * * * * *

 “Books are proof that humans can work magic.” — Dr. Carl Sagan

* * * * * * * * * *

 



Who was Alexis, and Why is he in the Library?

 

Alexis visited Flint, Michigan.

That’s correct; he stood right here on the grounds of our campus!

Wait.  What?

Who was this Alexis person?

Well, he was a globe-trekker —  a world explorer, especially into rough country and new civilizations.

He was also a law student.    A husband.  A civil servant.  A judge.  An elected member of the legislature.  A politician and a patriot.  And an author of some importance and world renown.

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M. Alexis de Tocqueville, author of DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA.

He was French gentry; a man who’s father was mayor of the town where he was born.  He attended the royal college in Metz where he studied rhetoric and philosophy before moving to Paris to study law.  After law school, he traveled to Italy with his brother Edouard and visited Rome, Naples and Scicily.  He wrote his first book after that trip, “Voyage en Sicile.”

Upon his return to France, Alexis was appointed juge auditeur in Versailles, which later lead to a position as deputy public prosecutor at the court of Versailles.

Alexis was born and raised among the privileged members of the last of the titled (and entitled) nobility of France in the early 1800s.

However, in 1830 during the July Revolution, the last Bourbon King of France (Charles X) is overthrown.  The new government is established as a constitutional monarchy, with Louis-Philippe as the new ruler.

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Combats de la rue de Rohan, je 29 juillet 1830. (Fighting in the Street de Rohan on July 29, 1830) Oil on canvas by Hippolyte Lecomte, 1857. Musee Carnavalet, Paris

Alexis reluctantly takes the required oath of loyalty to the new government and the new king, and in exchange receives a reduced position as juge suppleant (substitute judge).

 

 

By August, he is thinking of getting out of the country for a while.

In October, another Frenchman (Beaumont) wrote a report to the Minister of the Interior on the reform of the penal system in France.  In February the following year, Tocqueville and Beaumont were given an 18-month leave to study the penal system in the United States.  On April 2, Beaumont and d’Tocqueville together embark for America from Le Havre, France.  His life as an explorer in the wilds has begun.

And what, you ask has this got to do with the Thompson Library and the University of Michigan-Flint? 

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Observations by de Tocqueville on Flint, Michigan.

Among his many stops during his 1800s tour of the United States, Alexis De Tocqueville visited Michigan.  In fact, at one point he stood on the banks of the Flint River, pretty much where our campus is currently situated.

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Map noting route and major stops of Alexis de Tocqueville during his tour of the young United States in 1831-32.

Meanwhile, back in July 22 of 1832, Monsieur de Tocqueville arrived in Detroit (which he remarked upon for being very like France on one side of the river, while on the other, savages and naked children were to be found running around).

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Rough sketch by de Toucqueville of native American seen during his tour of the USA.

 

He stayed with some locals in Pontiac, where he observed a woman “dressed like a lady,” commenting that “Americans and their log house have the air of rich folk who have temporarily gone to spend a season in a hunting lodge.”

 

 

 

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Observations by de Tocqueville in Michigan.

 

From Pontiac, De Tocqueville traveled with an Indian guide who took them to Flint and Saginaw via the Flint River, documenting everything he saw along the way.

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Comments by de Tocqueville in Michigan.

Writing extensively on his travels, he diligently described in his book the area of Flint, the sights he saw and the people he observed during the early 1800s, recording for posterity the life and times of the early settlers in the United States during the early 1800s.

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Comments by de Tocqueville in Michigan.

 

Recording his observations throughout his journey, he interviewed presidents, lawyers, bankers and many settlers along the way.  Eventually he assembled his thoughts and ruminations on the formation of the new country and how its people lived into a ground-breaking two volume book entitled, Democracy in America.

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The first volume of Democracy in America was published in 1835.  The second volume, in 1840.

 

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Books related to M. Alexis de Tocqueville in Thompson Library collection.

 

Not only has this book been quoted or referenced by untold scads of other books and mentioned in many major speeches (including President Clinton’s STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS in ’95, Speaker Gingrich’s Opening Session speech of the 104th Congress in ’95, Ross Perot’s speech on saving Medicare and Medicaid in ’95, US Supreme Court cases any many others), it has also  never been out of print from the day it was first published to the present.

Fast forward almost 200 years.

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Video available in Thompson Library Check Out this Video and Watch History Happen.

The television network, C-SPAN, celebrates the incredible journey and writings of Alexis de Tocquville with a year-long program, filming a major documentary while driving to the many locations mentioned in de Tocqueville’s writings.

The C-SPAN people worked with schools to assist in teaching the history of de Tocqueville and the young United States, and with local communities to celebrate de Tocquville’s travels throughout the country.  As a way of honoring the book and its author, C-SPAN conferred commemorative plaques to memorialize the locations of note from his tour of the country.071 copy

As a “location of note” described in great detail in his writings, C-SPAN visited Flint, Michigan and presented us with a plaque noting the event and time period.

And now we arrive at the intertwined history of Monsieur Alexis de Tocqueville, French patriot and author, with the University of Michigan-Flint and the Thompson Library.

In a ceremony sponsored by the UM-F student History Club along with the Department of History and hosted by the Thompson Library, the C-SPAN plaque was officially and formally dedicated on November 20, 2014.

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Commemorative plaque presented by C-SPAN to Flint, Michigan noting the visit to this area by Alexis de Tocqueville in 1831-1832. Plaque may be seen in garden round near Thompson Library and Flint River on the campus of University of Michigan-Flint.

 

Speakers at the event included Dr. Roy Hanashiro, Chair of the History Department; Prof Thomas Henthorne, History Dept; Robert Houbeck, Director of Thompson Library; and Justin Wetenhall, President of the History Club.   (Mr. Wetenhall and Mr. Houbeck kindly shared the text of their speech with us, which appears in full at the bottom of this article.)

Members of the History Club, notably Jeanette Routhier and Shelby photo 18Blair, assembled a remarkable display of works by and about Alexis de Tocqueville, some of which are still on display in the Library.

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Books related to M. Alexis de Tocqueville in Thompson Library collection.

 

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Please see Shelby’s poster on the 3rd floor of Thompson Library near069 copy the Reference Desk.  On the 2nd display case of the Genesee Archives, Jeanette has created a smaller display highlighting some of the writings of de Tocqueville held in the Archives collection.

These, and many other works by Alexis de Tocqueville can be found in the Thompson Library.  We invite you to visit the Library and the Archives to read and view some of these works and films about his works.

They are YOUR  history.

129 copyThe plaque has been officially installed in the memorial garden round near Thompson Library and the Flint River, no doubt close to (if not actually on THE  spot) where Monsieur Alexis de Tocqueville — explorer and author of Democracy in America — stood overlooking the Flint River so many years ago.

 

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After Charlet and Jaime 1830 LG Folio Lithographs. French Revolution Antique Folio Lithographs Published 1830, Paris by Gihaut, for a series of prints of scenes from the 1830 Revolution in France. Pair lithographed on india paper after Nicolas Toussaint Charlet

 Images of French Revolution of 1830 which propelled de Tocqueville to America.

 

 

 

 

 

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M. Alexis de Tocqueville; explorer, politician, patriot and author.

 

 

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Thompson Library Director, Robert Houbeck and Political Science Prof Albert Price muse over the impact of de Tocqueville in America.

 

 

 

 

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.

 

 

 

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thompson Library hosts the Dedication Ceremony for the deTocqueville Plaque
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From left, Dir. Houbeck, Prof Price, Librarian Vince Prygoski, History Chair Hanashiro, History Prof Henthornand Jeanette Routhier

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.
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Rough sketch by de Tocqueville of observations in Michigan.

 

 

 

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.
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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.