Category Archives: Events

—– OPEN ALL NIGHT! —– Extended Hours at Thompson Library Start December 12, 2016.

 Finals are approaching.   We’re here to help.

Thompson Library  will be  OPEN  for  90  Consecutive Hours during Study Week!


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A reminder from the Library! Help for study stress during the Thompson Library 24 hour study days.
Studying at Thompson LibraryNeed a place to study on campus throughout the day and night?

The Frances Willson Thompson Library will open at 8 am on Monday, December 12th and will remain open  until 2am on Friday, December 16th.

Studying for Final Exams at Thompson Library

That’s right     —-    the library will remain open 24 hours Monday, Tuesday and Wed, not closing again until 2am on Friday, December 16th this year.

Thompson Library Atrium

This winter, in conjunction with and through the assistance of Student Government as well  as the generosity of volunteers within the library staff, Thompson Library will adjust its hours of operation, extending the time we are open.

 

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There will be several mini-events in the library throughout the 24 hour schedule to support students stressed by preparing for finals.

Student Life hands out breakfast sandwiches, bagels, beverages and more!

 

 

Student Government is providing light refreshments early in the evening.

Therapy Dogs visit University of Michigan-Flint campus. (2015)

 

 

 

Therapy Dogs will again be visiting Thompson Library this year to assist students dealing with Finals stress.  Come play with the dogs!  They’ll be here on Thursday (December 15th) from noon to 2 pm.

Detailed coloring books and pencils to help relieve stress.

Coloring books, those charming pages with intricate designs, will be available along with coloring pencils to help take your mind off studying for a few minutes.

 

Students needing to study for exams, or to work on that final paper,  are welcome during our extended hours at Thompson Library throughout the week.

Come and take advantage of these special extended hours to do all that last-minute cramming and put the final touches on your project this week.

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Silent Study Room Now Available

Thompson Library has over 900 chairs at carrels, tables and several study rooms in a quiet atmosphere.

Therapy Dogs visit Thompson Library

 

 

 

Study rooms can be reserved online. From the online list, select your preferred date, time and room, then pick up the key at the Circulation Desk when you arrive.  Reserve online and be guaranteed a group study space!

Reservation form online for Thompson Library study rooms!

 

 

Bring your coffee, your books and (if you want) your laptops – whatever you need to do your research and studying in a quiet, serene location conducive to scholarly contemplation.

Therapy Dogs visit Thompson Library

 

Campus-wide  Wi-Fi and the ITS computer lab machines and printers (on all 3 floors of the Library) are available.

Or check out a laptop using your library card (UMID) for use inside the library.

There are over 70 computers (including a few Macs) in the ITS lab located within the library (divided among all 3 floors).

One of the ITS Lab Papercut Print Queue Printer in Thompson Library

Additionally, ITS supplies the Library with 3 printer/copier machines (one on each floor) plus one color printer (3rd floor) for your convenience.  All printers are connected to the campus-wide print-queue via the Papercut system.

Control screen on the ITS Lab printer in Thompson Library.

Send your document to the printer from any ITS computer lab machine.  The document is saved in your personal print queue; no one else can see or print it.  Then retrieve your document at ANY ITS computer lab printer by sliding your UMID card to pull up YOUR list of items sent to printer.  Select the document you want now, hit print button.  It’s that easy.

You can even send documents to the print queue from your laptop via the campus WiFi system.  (See ITS website for instructions.)

Use the phones (next to printers) in Thompson Library to make free inter-campus calls. Call the ITS HelpDesk for assistance with computers, computer programs or printers. They’ll even help you print from a laptop!

Need technical assistance?   ITS has a telephone on the wall next to the printers with their 5 digit inter-campus number clearly posted.  Give them a call and they can walk you through any computer, software or printer difficulties.

Therapy Dogs visit Thompson Library

 

 

 

 

Need to charge your electronics?   There are many outlet plugs (including under each of the carrels along the edge of the room) for powering devices.

Be sure NOT to leave electronic devices unattended.  Not all elves have good intentions.  (Some are elves of mischief — and theft.)

 

Laptops available for checkout! Ask at Circulation Desk. Use your library card (UMIC) to check out a laptop. In-library use, only.
  • Laptops are available to checkout for use within the library.

 

  • VHS and DVD players are available in each of the Study Rooms.

 

  • Study Rooms can be reserved online (check the UM-Flint Thompson Library website) for study groups.
Midnight at the oasis — the Reference Desk. Vera Anderson and Vince Prygoski working the post-midnight hours in the Library.

Plus there are Reference Librarians on hand to help you find and use the research materials provided by the library, both in print and online.

 

 

DVDs, VHS tapes, Music CDs — plus books and ebooks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thompson Library provides access to:

  • Over 250,000 books shelved in our building and an additional 500,000 ebooks online (available to borrow just like the print books, but readable as full text online).
  • A collection of over 4,000 music CDs and videos in DVD format.
  • Over 1,000 databases offering indexes to scholarly journals and data sets, many full text online.

… and so much more!

 

And — as always  — our librarians and staff will be available to assist students with their research needs.

 

 


—    HOURS  OF  OPERATION    —

 

Through the end of December 2016, Thompson Library will be open during the following hours:

 

                Monday (12th)  —  Thursday (15th):   Open 24 hours

      Friday (16th) :                                                   Close at 2am.

                Friday (16th) :                                                   8  am     to  10 pm

                Saturday :                                                           10  am    to  10 pm   

      Sunday:                                                                12 noon to 12 midnight

                Monday (19th)  —  Tuesday (20th):     8 am to    2 am

      Wednesday (21st):                                        8 am to 12 midnight

      Thursday (22nd):                                            8 am  to   6 pm

                Friday (23rd):                                                    8 am to    6 pm

                Saturday (24th)  —    Begin  Winter  Intersession —  CLOSED 

 

HAPPY  NEW  YEAR!

Winter Semester Begins  —  January 3, 2017

Winter Hours in Effect for 2017

(See:   Library Hours for calendar of hours through April 2017)


Need some holiday entertainment???

 

Should you need something enticing, enlightening or stimulating, or just plain FUN to read during this long winter break — remember your library has a large paperback  collection of “good reads,” at the bottom of the stairs on the 1st floor (just beyond the Oversized books), an extensive literature collection (see the call items in call number PS on the 1st floor near the windows) as well as plenty of best sellers and topically or timely fascinating books in our Browsing Collection.

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The semester is almost over.

Let’s go to the Library!

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *



Thompson Library Hosts Organ Donor Drive

 

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There is a desperate need for people to registered as organ donors upon their death to help save  lives of those who through injury, birth defects, or disease are in desperate need of replacement organs.

 

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Informing the public of the facts of organ donation and getting as many people as possible to register as organ donors is vital.

 

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Once again, as we have for the past 5 years, University of Michigan-Flint’s Thompson Library hosted an Organ Donor event in October in conjunction with the UM-Flint Student Nurses Association.

 

Libraries all across the State of Michigan participated in the event, raising awareness and signing up thousands of new donors while simultaneously enlightening thousands more about the need for organ donors.

The results of the 2016 organ donor drive are as follows:

University of Michigan-Flint, Thompson Library

     Hours booth was open:                                                 8

     New Donors registered:                                             43

     Visitors already registered as donors:             288

     People asking for information:                                 83

How does this compare with UM-Flint’s participation in years past?   Here’s how it breaks down:

Year                       New Donors Registered

2016                                       43

2015                                       32

2014                                       42

2013                                       48

2012                                       67

2011                                       77

2010                                       72

Volunteers manning the Thompson Library organ donor registration table.

Numbers may have dropped over earlier years, but overall University of Michigan-Flint continues to have good participation and regularly increases the number of Michigan citizens who are now on the organ donor list.

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How do we compare to other libraries over the years?  Here’s the breakdown:

Year             All Libraries       New Flint Donors          Flint Donors%

2010                        5                                    72                                   32.0%

2011                      10                                  77                                    18.6%

2012                      29                                  67                                       9.4%

2013                      38                                  48                                       8.4%

2014                      57                                  42                                       7.9%

2015                      60                                  32                                       7.2%

2016                      74                                  43                                       7.0%

 

Statewide, there were 154 participating organizations, with 74 staffed organ donor registration tables and 80 organ donor informational displays.

 

2016 Statistics — State of Michigan

New Donors registered:                                                          597

Visitors already registered as donors:                        2,558

Potential Donors asking for information:                  1,907

Total visitors to booth:                                                         4,872

Hours booth was open:                                                           823

Volunteers manning the Thompson Library organ donor registration table.

In all, UM-Flint contributed about 7% of the total people who registered as organ donors during the one-day drive this year.

Well done, University of Michigan-Flint people!

For more information, see:

Michigan Libraries for Life



Save

Patriots & Peacemakers; Serving their Nation, and the World


Arab Americans

In Service to Our Country

Patriots  –  Peace Makers  –  Diplomats


 

img_3576fullsizeEarly in September, a new and thought-provoking walk-though display was assembled on the 3rd floor of the Thompson Library near the main entrance.

(Click on any photo to enlarge)

The display addresses what one person interviewed described as  the responsibility to give back to your nation.   Various categories of service are listed, all that serve in one aspect or the other as either:   Patriot, Peace Maker, or Diplomat.

Brought to us by the Arab American National Museum, this traveling img_3366-002display will be available to experience in the University of Michigan-Flint Thompson Library through December 2016.

The display highlights the contribution of Arab Americans in service to their country from the 1800’s to present day.

img_3378First on the list of information available to the viewer as one walks through the display is a simple but perhaps not well known fact; Arab Americans are not a small nor homogeneous group of tight-knit people with an identical ethnicity.

They derive from a very diverse popularion with widely disparate backgrounds, img_3567heritages, customs and religions coming from a large area of the globe that consists of many countries and regions.   The one thing they have in common is that they all have roots in that geographic area which spans the lands  identified as the Middle East and across the length of northern Africa.

img_3418-002Whether they are men or women, Muslims or Christians, old or img_3559young, these Americans have a long history of service to their country.

 

img_3410As you walk through the display, you’ll see images of men and women that served in various branches of the United States armed forces.

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You can read stories of men and women who served in World War I (nearly 14,000), World War II (over 15,000) and other engagements — many serving with distinction and honors.

Too many gave their country the last, full measure of devotion.

 

You can read about Rear Admiral Faye Glenn Abdellah, who also img_3404served as Deputy Surgeon General (1949 – 1989) — the first nurse and the first woman to hold that position.  Descending from both Algerian and Scottish heritage, her theories revolutionized nursing care, altering it from the standard disease-centered care to an improved  patient-centered approach.

You can read of the many other officers and soldiers (both men and img_3569women) who served the US military along with where and how they served, including the 3,500 Arab Americans currently serving their country today.

(Click on any image to enlarge.)

 

img_3563After the infamy that was 9/11, many of these patriots found their loyalties questioned, and as a result the Association of Patriotic Arab Americans in the Military (APAAM) formed to offer support to Americans who, through no other reason than their ethnic origins, came under special scrutiny.

It was one of the first formal organizations for active and veteran img_3561Arab American service members, people who — by their beliefs and record of service to their nation — consider themselves Patriots.

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Being a patriot does not prevent a person from also being a Peace Maker, however.  As you walk through the fascinating display, you’ll img_3571see the record of many Arab Americans who served their nation in an entirely different way, through the Peace Corps.

img_3564The Peace Corps was established in 1961 by President John F. Kennedy to promote world peace and provide an international public service.  It is a volunteer organization which helps communities around the world understand U.S. culture while helping Americans understand the cultures of other groups and nations.

img_3572From the beginning days of the Peace Corps, Arab Americans have served; people such as Donna Shalala (1962), Bill Aossey and Janet Ghattas (1963), and many others have contributed to the success of the Peace Corps program.

The list of volunteers includes many who had previously served in the United States military, such as Antoinette Byda Peters Day (US Army, 1966 – 1970; Peace Corps, 2007 – 2009), proving that Arab Americans can be both Patriots AND Peace Makers within their lives, contributing both service to their country and service to their fellow man on behalf of their country.

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Another way many Arab Americans have combined these two aspects into their lives has been service in the U. S. Diplomatic Corps, many serving in positions in countries around the globe since World War II and in even greater numbers within the past 30 years.

img_3454As you wander through the expansive display, you’ll see interesting artifacts, watch video clips, listen to audio descriptions, and even get a chance to learn a few words in other languages.

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The historical information is informative, and photos are striking, and it is well worth the time to visit and meander through the display.

img_3389But alas, it is only on loan to the University of Michigan-Flint from the Arab American National Museum for a limited time.

We urge you to take advantage of this fascinating and informative display while it is available to our campus.

img_3388To visit the display, enter the Thompson Library  (University of Michigan-Flint) on the 3rd floor.

The display is easily seen from the entrance, directly behind the INFORMATION DESK.

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img_3402(Click on any image to enlarge.)

 

 

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(Click on any photo to enlarge!)

 

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(Click on any photo to enlarge!)

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Camp Summer Fun Visited the Library

 


Camp Summer Fun

UM-Flint Recreation Center and the Flint Cultural Center
A FUN and ENRICHING CAMP EXPERIENCE

  for Summer 2016!
For ages 6 – 11.

Campers benefit from the expertise and quality programming developed with supervision from faculty and students of the UM-Flint School of Education and Human Services. Camp Counselors are Education majors from the University and/or community members with demonstrated experience supervising young people. Education staff members from the Flint Cultural Center organizations are degreed educators in their respective fields.

Campers spend their mornings at the Flint Cultural Center, with Tuesday through Thursday dedicated to the weekly theme.


 

Every summer, the University of Michigan-Flint offers area youth the opportunity of joining the UM-F Camp Summer Fun.

It’s both an enjoyable and an educational opportunity for children ages 6 through 11 to be on campus and take advantage of the various services and opportunities here, supervised by qualified staff.

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This summer, the Campers had a new experience — a Day in the Library — where they selected from a wide range of books they could sit and read — or have a camp staffer read with them.

 

 

 

 

The campers had a great time walking img_3135through the Thompson Library, listening to a brief presentation by a librarian, and speaking with the Reference Librarian (Micky Doyle), who demonstrated how a librarian img_3130could help them find a book from in our collection on any topic they wanted.img_3129

 

They had a great time, and we enjoyed hosting them.

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Hope to see all of you back again in a few years, Campers.

 

Next time, as  UM-Flint students!

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Library Participated in ‘Be a Tourist in Your Home Town’ Event

On Saturday, July 16, 2016 the Frances Willson Thompson Library was a stop during the Flint & Genesee Convention and Visitor Bureau’s fourth annual Be a Tourist on Your Home Town event. The event ran from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and “tourists” paid $1 for a wristband that admitted them to many of the cultural and educational institutions in downtown, the campus/cultural, and the Miller Road/Court Street areas. MTA provided free bus routes to get between the various destinations.

CNNPoster
Although the library is open every Saturday (with exceptions for intersessions and holidays), we had a few special treats for the event.

In our atrium we had a peek behind the scenes of the CNN broadcast that took place around the Democratic Presidential Debate on March 6, 2016.

We opened the Genesee Historical Collections Center  for the day. The Center’s typical hours are Monday – Friday 1 – 5 p.m., with additional evening hours on Wednesdays until 9 p.m.

Our student worker is ready to answer questions about the Center's collections.
Our student worker is ready to answer questions about the Center’s collections.

On display were some photos from the collection, most notably about the Arab American history of Flint and Genesee County.

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CrapoRoom
Enter the Crapo Room and step into the 19th century.

We also opened the Crapo Room, so that visitors could step into the 19th century. The Crapo Room was created in part to preserve the memory of Governor Henry Howland Crapo, Michigan’s 14th governor (serving from 1865 – 1869) and a Flint industrialist. Most the the furnishings and items in the room have been donated by his descendants, including Frances Willson Thompson, his great-granddaughter and the library’s benefactor.

Musicbox Visitors to the Crapo Room were able to experience some early 20th century entertainment in the form of a music box, which was given to the Nurses Home of Hurley Hospital by William Crapo Durant in memory of his mother Rebecca Crapo Durant (daughter of Governor Crapo) in the 1920s.

(Click on any image to enlarge.)

We enjoyed welcoming our hometown tourists and we look forward to next year’s event!



Science in the Library: Icebergs, the Internet and other things that start with ‘I.’

 


What can a library — and a librarian — teach students about science, scientific investigation, and critical thinking?


 

On Friday, April 29, 2016, the University of Michigan-Flint hosted Super Science Friday, an event aimed at 7th and 8th grade students to demonstrate various scientific areas of inquiry and encourage them to get involved in scientific research themselves.

Several of our teaching faculty offered visiting students from schools across Genesee county  presentations dealing with a wide variety of topics which illuminated specific fields of scientific investigation.

Students of librarian Laura Friesen's class learn about icebergs, the internet, and scientific investigation. And of course, about recording findings and sharing them with other researchers through publication! She IS a librarian, after all.
Students of librarian Laura Friesen’s class learn about icebergs, the internet, and scientific investigation. And of course, about recording findings and sharing them with other researchers through publication! She IS a librarian, after all. (CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE)

One such presentation was conducted by Thompson Library’s own Laura Friesen, librarian.

Laura titled her presentation, “Science in the Library: Icebergs, the Internet and other things that start with ‘I.’”

Her presentation was designed to encourage students to look beyond the obvious and develop  critical thinking skills and apply those skills to scientific investigation.   Beyond that, Laura demonstrated what working scientist did with the information they gathered through scientific methodology (conducting experiments while observing and recording results).

The students attending her presentation — two groups of 8th graders attending Mt Morris and Genesee Christian Academy — were reminded that scientific investigation done well required careful observation.

The students then had the opportunity to observe and consider the physical traits of a large, rectangular block of ice Laura had brought into the classroom.  Laura explains that she created the block by pouring water into a loaf pan and freezing it.

The block of ice was placed in a deep bucket of water.  Not surprisingly, the block floated on the water.   The block floated in a horizontal position, very little showing above the water line and with a long flat side exposed to air.  The rest of the block of ice sunk under the water line,  “hidden” beneath the water.

Laura changed the parameters of the ice block to observe what would happen.   She tilted the ice block vertically in the water.

Instead of sinking below the water, it stood on-end, with half of the block visible above the water.

Laura released the block.  It flipped back and returned to it’s former LauraFriesenClass1horizontal position, floating with the majority of it’s substance beneath the water, but notably wider from side-to-side than it was  deep.

After observing how the ice block behaved when placed into deep water, the students were now directed to the Internet, where Laura searched for and displayed several photographs of icebergs.

She specifically selected one particular image from those available online and asked the students to think about that image and compare what they saw in the image to what they had learned about how ice behaved as it floated in water.

As the students considered what they had learned doing their experiment and compared it to the image on-screen, they detected a few anomalies.

The image showed an iceberg that was notably longer top-to-bottom than it was side-to-side, thrusting deeply into the water while remaining very narrow (side-to-side) at the surface of the water, even though it was no wider below surface than above.

The students carefully examined the image and compared it against what they had discovered during their experiment, and concluded that the image displayed could not possibly exist in nature.

All students attending the class had ably demonstrated that they could apply knowledge they had gained (information regarding the behavior of large bodies of ice floating in water), to an image found on the Internet.   They used critical thinking skills, dissecting the image and what properties it visually described they believedto be  viable — and which were not.

Using this knowledge, the students declared the Internet image to be pure fakery.

The students were correct.

The image Laura had pulled up from an online website was actually a composite made up of four disparate images:

  1.   one of the sky,
  2.   one of the water as background,
  3.   one of the tip of the iceberg,
  4.   and yet another of another tip of an iceberg turned up-side-down

The image created a psuedo-iceberg that appeared to show the observer both above water and below at the same time.

But appearances can be deceiving!

Without critical thinking skills, anyone looking at that image on the Internet could be lead to believe it was a single image which displayed how an iceberg looked and behaved when floating in the ocean.

The exercise demonstrated to the students why finding the necessary criteria (either through published results of research done by other scientists or by their own experimentation and observations) and applying that information to the situation presented to them is vital in forwarding scientific investigation.

Laura went beyond the basic experiment into the concept of using the observations of other scientists.  This is where the importance of a library was considered — and investigated.

A scientist does not need to begin their research from nothing.  They use the experimentation and observations of earlier scientists to increase their understanding of the universe and how it works.

By using the knowledge (writings) of those that have come before, the new investigators can “stand on the shoulders of giants” to learn what has already been discovered and create their own research projects, then add their observations and conclusions to the body of human knowledge and understandings as valued scientific contributors.

To illustrate this concept, Laura showed the students the first article written by Sir Isaac Newton,  published in 1672.

JSTORlogoThat article is available to all UM-Flint researchers through the  Thompson Library database JSTOR.

Discovery of the Dispersion of Light and of the Nature of Color (1672) in JSTOR//

[Newton, I., & Sarton, G.. (1930). Discovery of the Dispersion of Light and of the Nature of Color (1672). Isis, 14(2), 326–341. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/224679]

 

Laura then broke the students up into teams and had each team read and present to the class information from articles published in either National Geographic or Discover.   This exercise demonstrated the need for scientists to organize their information and present it logically to their peers to help further human understanding.

With a new appreciation for the scientific observations and published writings of earlier scientists to inform and direct the research of a new generation of scientists, the students considered the various presentations they had heard.

As a whole, the class voted on which team of scientific presenters did the best job of interpreting the information from their article to the rest of the class.   The winning teams were awarded a prize — a science book selected by a librarian specifically for this event.  (What else would a librarian consider a prize than a book full of knowledge?!)

The students left Laura’s class with a better understanding of the value of a library and its purpose of collecting and providing access to information compiled by researchers using scientific methodology to gather knowledge and share it with other researchers.

To stand on the shoulders of giants, to gain knowledge collected by scientist and academics engaged in research within a variety of subjects, and to eventually share new information with other researchers — the library is the place to start and the eventual depository for all scientific inquiry.

Scientific investigation and observation, recording and disseminating information, collecting and sharing that information, research skills to find and use the knowledge provided by earlier researchers and furthered by critical analysis thinking skills — teaching these skills are all in a days work for a librarian.

Thanks, Laura!



 

LIBRARY OPEN 24 HOURS

Finals are approaching.   We’re here to help.

Thompson Library open 24 hours during Study Days week.


 

Need a place to study on campus throughout the day and night?photo (11)

The Frances Willson Thompson Library will open at 8 am on Monday, December 7th and will remain open  until midnight on Thursday, December 10th.

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That’s right   —

the library will remain open 24 hours Monday, Tuesday and Wed, not closing again until midnight on Thursday, December 10th.

 

 

 

photo (14)This winter, in conjunction with and through the assistance of Student Government as well as the generosity of volunteers within the library staff, Thompson Library will adjust its hours of operation, extending the time we are open.

 

photo (5)There will be several mini-events in the library throughout the 24 hour schedule to support students stressed by preparing for finals.

 

 

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Student Life hands out breakfast sandwiches, bagels, beverages and more!

Student Government is providing light refreshments early in the evening.   To shake off a little stress and get bodies moving, Brooke and George from Theater Department will lead yoga stretching exercises in the Media Room (3rd floor) during the evening.

 

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Therapy Dogs visit University of Michigan-Flint campus. (2015)
Therapy Dogs will visit Thompson Library on Tuesday, December 15 to assist students dealing with stress.

 

 

 

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Detailed coloring books and pencils to help relieve stress.

Coloring books, those charming pages with intricate designs, will be available along with coloring pencils to help take your mind off studying for a few minutes.  (Sometimes that’s all that’s needed to re-focus your mind to the task at hand.)

Students needing to study for exams or work on that final paper are welcome to come and take advantage of these special extended hours for this week.

 

Thompson Library has over 900 chairs at carrels, tables and study rooms in a quiet atmosphere.

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Therapy Dogs visit Thompson Library
Study rooms can be reserved online; pick up the key at the front desk when you arrive and be guaranteed a study space!

Bring your coffee, your books and (if you want) your laptops – whatever you need to do your research and studying in a quiet, serene location conducive to scholarly contemplation.

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Therapy Dogs visit Thompson Library

 

 

 

Both campus Wi-Fi and ITS lab computers and printers are available.  Or check out a laptop using your library card (UMID) for use inside the library.

There are over 70 computers (including a few Macs) in the ITS lab located within the library (divided among all 3 floors).  Additionally, ITS supplies 3 printer/copier machines (one on each floor).

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Therapy Dogs visit Thompson Library
There are many outlet plugs (including under each of the carrels along the edge of the room) for powering devices.

Laptops are available to checkout for use within the library.

VHS and DVD players are available in each of the Study Rooms.

Study Rooms can be reserved online (check the UM-Flint Thompson Library website) for study groups.

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Midnight at the oasis — the Reference Desk. Vera Anderson and Vince Prygoski working the post-midnight hours in the Library. December 7, 2015

Plus there are Reference Librarians on hand to help you find and use the research materials provided by the library, both in print and online.

 

 

 

Thompson Library provides access to:

  • Over 250,000 books shelved in our building and an additional 500,000 ebooks online (available to borrow just like the print books, but readable as full text online).
  • A collection of over 4,000 music CDs and videos in DVD format.
  • Over 1,000 databases offering indexes to scholarly journals and data sets, many full text online.

… and so much more!

 

 

 

 

photo (16)And as always, our

librarians and staff will be available to assist students with their research needs.

 

 

 

 

 

— HOURS OF OPERATION —

 

 

Through the end of December 2015, Thompson Library will be open during the following hours:

 

                Monday (7th)  —  Wednesday (9th):    Open 24 hours

      Thursday (10th) –                                             Close at midnight.

                Friday (11th):                                                       8 am to 7 pm

                Saturday:                                                             10 am to 9 pm   

      Sunday:                                                                 12 noon to 12 midnight

                Monday (14th)  —  Thursday (17th):     8 am to 2 am

                Friday (18th):                                                       8 am to 9 pm

                Saturday (19th):                                              10 am to 9 pm   

      Sunday (20th):                                                  12 noon to 12 midnight

      Monday (21st):                                                    8 am to midnight

      Tuesday & Wed (22 & 24th):                       8 am to 6 pm.

Along with the rest of the University of Michigan-Flint campus, Thompson Library will be CLOSED for intersession from December 24 through January 1st, and re-open on January 2, 2016.

Browsing Collection Fiction 2And — should you need something to read during this long winter break — remember your library has a large paperback fiction collection of “good reads,” along with our new Browsing Collection of best sellers.

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The semester is almost over.  Let’s go to the Library!

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Thompson Library Hosts Bill Webb Retirement Reception

photo (10)With joy — and a little sadness — Thompson Library hosted the celebration of the life and career of Bill Webb on the University of Michigan-Flint campus.   Bill has served in both the Department of Human Resources and as assistant Vice Chancellor for Business and Finance for nearly three decades.

photo (5)During the ceremonies, Bill received a set of going away gifts, appropriately enough for the venue, bookends and books (all dealing with retirement, of course).

photo (7)Several people shared their remembrances of Bill’s high points and activities throughout the years.

photo (19)aProminent among them was our own Bob Houbeck, Director of Thompson Library.

Below are comments from Bob on his memories of their shared time at University of Michigan-Flint, and some of the high points of Bill’s career he remembers most vividly.

 

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Remarks on the Occasion of Bill Webb’s Retirement
Library Atrium, F. W. Thompson Library
30 September 2015

Bill and I came to UM-Flint nearly 25 years ago.   During those two-plus decades, we had lunch most every week.   At those weekly lunches, I learned a lot from Bill about business and finance. He learned a lot from me about Thucydides and the Peloponnesian Wars.
I also learned a lot of new words and expressions – Bill’s a U.S. Navy Vietnam veteran, you know.   That experience helped me better understand an etymological connection; that “Old Salts” often salt their conversation with “salty language.”
Whether you knew it or not, Bill had a direct hand in many of the most important projects and activities of the campus, noticed and unnoticed.   And I don’t just mean inclement weather closings and power outages  (I’m sure, Judy, that neither of you will miss those 3:30 am wake-ups to check out the latest weather pattern, and the subsequent phone consultations … )
To refresh memories, let’s go through the litany:

• the acquisition and initial operation of Northbank Center;

• the construction of the William S. White Building;

• renovations to French Hall and the Murchie Science Building;

• the relocation of the School of Management to Riverfront;

• the construction of First Street Housing;

• the reopening of Kearsley Street and the opening up of Wilson Park and its integration into campus;

• all the issues related to parking (including responding at Student Concern Forums), to space allocation, to campus landscaping, to food services;

• the campus Mass Transit Authority (MTA) shuttle as well as its recent expansion to East Village;

• as well as a host of environmental, safety & security initiatives, from improved campus lighting, installation of security cameras & phones, our All-Hazards Emergency Preparedness team, to the Student Update Information Team (S.U.I.T.), the precursor to the current Behavior Intervention Team (B.I.T.);

• right up to the new Zipcar service for students.

Bill had a direct hand, sometimes the lead hand, in all these major projects & expansions.

We’re a stronger and a better campus because of your work, Bill.

But we in the University are better off not only because Bill did his UM-Flint job well.

Though he lives in East Lansing, Bill was consistently active at a personal level in the Flint community.   He was to Flint a genuine good neighbor.   Thus, Bill served for many years, for example, in the downtown Flint Rotary Club (including each year spending a weekend driving young people to an annual Rotary youth leadership retreat in Canada, and then shepherding them back home across the border – I helped with this worthwhile but harrowing Rotary service project once, Bill did it year after year).   Bill spent two years helping the Flint Community Schools develop a long-term plan for school buildings.   And he served on a number of City of Flint civic initiatives, including helping create the Safe Homes-Safe Neighborhoods-Safe Community project.

It’s hard to walk around downtown Flint with Bill and not run into some civic, or business, or educational leader who doesn’t know him and want to chat.

Both the campus and the city will miss you, Bill.

But, on the bright side, Bill’s involvement in all these projects means that, I figure for at least the next two years, the rest of us have a ready-made excuse:   “Ah, that – that’s Bill’s fault.”

Speaking personally, Bill, I’m going to miss our weekly lunches.

Speaking as a librarian, I’m very much looking forward to your memoirs.   At those lunches, Bill didn’t tell even me everything. We’ve got a spot reserved on our Archives bookshelf.   Put us down, Bill, for an advance copy.

Finally, despite his 25 years with this University of Michigan campus, Bill, I’m saddened to report, has remained an incorrigible Michigan State fan.  (It’s very humbling.   I’m not nearly as persuasive as I like to think I am … )

Never mind.

In our hearts, Bill, you will always be one of the true  Leaders and Best.

 

Robert L. Houbeck, Jr.
Director, F. W. Thompson Library

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We’ll miss you, Bill.

Enjoy your retirement — and think of us sometimes.    Especially on cold winter mornings when the wind is howling and the snow is 3 feet deep, and still coming down.

 

 


 

Office of Admissions & Honors Program Team for Recruitment Event in Library Atrium

Thompson Library is dedicated to linking people with ideas — it’s right there in our logo.

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Sydney Spielmaker, UM-Flint Honors Student Sharing her experience with guests at Honors Program Recruitment Reception, October 2015

One way we are able to encourage scholarly activities is to host events dedicated to scholarly achievement and the advancement of our campus, especially those that showcase our students.  Such an event is the annual Honors Program Autumn Reception.

During September, the Office of Admissions sponsored a series of events held in Atrium of the Thompson Library to recruit high-achieving high school students to University of Michigan-Flint and to tell them about the Honors Program and the many benefits it offers our students.

photo (4)cOf the select group invited, approximately 20 to 25 young people (and their parents) attended each presentation over two separate evenings.  In attendance were guests from as far away as Gaylord, Grand Rapids and the Upper Peninsula.

The library Atrium provided a perfect setting to display our campus at its finest, with 3 stories of windows providing natural lighting while overlooking the Flint River and the White Building on the far bank.  Catered by Fandangles as a sit-down buffet, the evening was both elegant and energized.

photo (3)cCurrent UM-Flint Honors Program students were on hand to share their experiences as a student.  Students spoke of the type of studies they were involved in — ranging from computer science through medicine and more — the research projects they participated in with leading members of their field of interest, and of course, the semester spent abroad (Off-Campus Experience), which is a highlight of the Honors Program.

photo (4)aProgram Director, Maureen Thum, spoke of the exciting opportunities and experiences of students in the program.  She also talked about the many successes of Honors Program  graduates in their application to professional and graduate schools, and to professional positions.

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John Davidson, Director of Admissions, UM-Flint Discussing Honors Program during recruitment reception. October 2015

Admissions Director Jon Davidson and his staff were on hand to assist parents with questions regarding enrollment applications, dorm options and other practical matters.

Honors students were available for one-on-one consultations with guests who had questions regarding specific areas of studies and the opportunities and experiences opened to them as students of the Program.

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UM-Flint Honors Student shares his experience with guests at the Honors Program Recruitment Reception hosted by Office of Admissions, October 2015.

Our students were enthusiastic regarding their experiences working side-by-side with leading experts from around the world, conducting original research in a variety of fields, and presenting papers at conferences — experiences rarely available to undergrad students, but common among the University of Michigan-Flint Honors students.

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When speaking to guests, the students did not sugar-coat their involvement in the Honors Program; the work is hard, but the rewards are both gratifying — and amazing.   Graduates of the Program have had opportunities open to them they would otherwise never have imagined.

Many of the guests and their families left with applications.

Hopefully, events such as these will ensure we will have many years of outstanding Honors Program students graduating from UM-Flint to go out into the world and demonstrate in a very positive way why they are among “The Leaders and the Best!”

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Who was Alexis, and Why is he in the Library?

 

Alexis visited Flint, Michigan.

That’s correct; he stood right here on the grounds of our campus!

Wait.  What?

Who was this Alexis person?

Well, he was a globe-trekker —  a world explorer, especially into rough country and new civilizations.

He was also a law student.    A husband.  A civil servant.  A judge.  An elected member of the legislature.  A politician and a patriot.  And an author of some importance and world renown.

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M. Alexis de Tocqueville, author of DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA.

He was French gentry; a man who’s father was mayor of the town where he was born.  He attended the royal college in Metz where he studied rhetoric and philosophy before moving to Paris to study law.  After law school, he traveled to Italy with his brother Edouard and visited Rome, Naples and Scicily.  He wrote his first book after that trip, “Voyage en Sicile.”

Upon his return to France, Alexis was appointed juge auditeur in Versailles, which later lead to a position as deputy public prosecutor at the court of Versailles.

Alexis was born and raised among the privileged members of the last of the titled (and entitled) nobility of France in the early 1800s.

However, in 1830 during the July Revolution, the last Bourbon King of France (Charles X) is overthrown.  The new government is established as a constitutional monarchy, with Louis-Philippe as the new ruler.

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Combats de la rue de Rohan, je 29 juillet 1830. (Fighting in the Street de Rohan on July 29, 1830) Oil on canvas by Hippolyte Lecomte, 1857. Musee Carnavalet, Paris

Alexis reluctantly takes the required oath of loyalty to the new government and the new king, and in exchange receives a reduced position as juge suppleant (substitute judge).

 

 

By August, he is thinking of getting out of the country for a while.

In October, another Frenchman (Beaumont) wrote a report to the Minister of the Interior on the reform of the penal system in France.  In February the following year, Tocqueville and Beaumont were given an 18-month leave to study the penal system in the United States.  On April 2, Beaumont and d’Tocqueville together embark for America from Le Havre, France.  His life as an explorer in the wilds has begun.

And what, you ask has this got to do with the Thompson Library and the University of Michigan-Flint? 

[Click on any image to enlarge.]

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Observations by de Tocqueville on Flint, Michigan.

Among his many stops during his 1800s tour of the United States, Alexis De Tocqueville visited Michigan.  In fact, at one point he stood on the banks of the Flint River, pretty much where our campus is currently situated.

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Map noting route and major stops of Alexis de Tocqueville during his tour of the young United States in 1831-32.

Meanwhile, back in July 22 of 1832, Monsieur de Tocqueville arrived in Detroit (which he remarked upon for being very like France on one side of the river, while on the other, savages and naked children were to be found running around).

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Rough sketch by de Toucqueville of native American seen during his tour of the USA.

 

He stayed with some locals in Pontiac, where he observed a woman “dressed like a lady,” commenting that “Americans and their log house have the air of rich folk who have temporarily gone to spend a season in a hunting lodge.”

 

 

 

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Observations by de Tocqueville in Michigan.

 

From Pontiac, De Tocqueville traveled with an Indian guide who took them to Flint and Saginaw via the Flint River, documenting everything he saw along the way.

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Comments by de Tocqueville in Michigan.

Writing extensively on his travels, he diligently described in his book the area of Flint, the sights he saw and the people he observed during the early 1800s, recording for posterity the life and times of the early settlers in the United States during the early 1800s.

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Comments by de Tocqueville in Michigan.

 

Recording his observations throughout his journey, he interviewed presidents, lawyers, bankers and many settlers along the way.  Eventually he assembled his thoughts and ruminations on the formation of the new country and how its people lived into a ground-breaking two volume book entitled, Democracy in America.

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The first volume of Democracy in America was published in 1835.  The second volume, in 1840.

 

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Books related to M. Alexis de Tocqueville in Thompson Library collection.

 

Not only has this book been quoted or referenced by untold scads of other books and mentioned in many major speeches (including President Clinton’s STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS in ’95, Speaker Gingrich’s Opening Session speech of the 104th Congress in ’95, Ross Perot’s speech on saving Medicare and Medicaid in ’95, US Supreme Court cases any many others), it has also  never been out of print from the day it was first published to the present.

Fast forward almost 200 years.

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Video available in Thompson Library Check Out this Video and Watch History Happen.

The television network, C-SPAN, celebrates the incredible journey and writings of Alexis de Tocquville with a year-long program, filming a major documentary while driving to the many locations mentioned in de Tocqueville’s writings.

The C-SPAN people worked with schools to assist in teaching the history of de Tocqueville and the young United States, and with local communities to celebrate de Tocquville’s travels throughout the country.  As a way of honoring the book and its author, C-SPAN conferred commemorative plaques to memorialize the locations of note from his tour of the country.071 copy

As a “location of note” described in great detail in his writings, C-SPAN visited Flint, Michigan and presented us with a plaque noting the event and time period.

And now we arrive at the intertwined history of Monsieur Alexis de Tocqueville, French patriot and author, with the University of Michigan-Flint and the Thompson Library.

In a ceremony sponsored by the UM-F student History Club along with the Department of History and hosted by the Thompson Library, the C-SPAN plaque was officially and formally dedicated on November 20, 2014.

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Commemorative plaque presented by C-SPAN to Flint, Michigan noting the visit to this area by Alexis de Tocqueville in 1831-1832. Plaque may be seen in garden round near Thompson Library and Flint River on the campus of University of Michigan-Flint.

 

Speakers at the event included Dr. Roy Hanashiro, Chair of the History Department; Prof Thomas Henthorne, History Dept; Robert Houbeck, Director of Thompson Library; and Justin Wetenhall, President of the History Club.   (Mr. Wetenhall and Mr. Houbeck kindly shared the text of their speech with us, which appears in full at the bottom of this article.)

Members of the History Club, notably Jeanette Routhier and Shelby photo 18Blair, assembled a remarkable display of works by and about Alexis de Tocqueville, some of which are still on display in the Library.

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Books related to M. Alexis de Tocqueville in Thompson Library collection.

 

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Please see Shelby’s poster on the 3rd floor of Thompson Library near069 copy the Reference Desk.  On the 2nd display case of the Genesee Archives, Jeanette has created a smaller display highlighting some of the writings of de Tocqueville held in the Archives collection.

These, and many other works by Alexis de Tocqueville can be found in the Thompson Library.  We invite you to visit the Library and the Archives to read and view some of these works and films about his works.

They are YOUR  history.

129 copyThe plaque has been officially installed in the memorial garden round near Thompson Library and the Flint River, no doubt close to (if not actually on THE  spot) where Monsieur Alexis de Tocqueville — explorer and author of Democracy in America — stood overlooking the Flint River so many years ago.

 

[Click on any image to enlarge.]

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After Charlet and Jaime 1830 LG Folio Lithographs. French Revolution Antique Folio Lithographs Published 1830, Paris by Gihaut, for a series of prints of scenes from the 1830 Revolution in France. Pair lithographed on india paper after Nicolas Toussaint Charlet

 Images of French Revolution of 1830 which propelled de Tocqueville to America.

 

 

 

 

 

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M. Alexis de Tocqueville; explorer, politician, patriot and author.

 

 

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Thompson Library Director, Robert Houbeck and Political Science Prof Albert Price muse over the impact of de Tocqueville in America.

 

 

 

 

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.

 

 

 

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thompson Library hosts the Dedication Ceremony for the deTocqueville Plaque
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From left, Dir. Houbeck, Prof Price, Librarian Vince Prygoski, History Chair Hanashiro, History Prof Henthornand Jeanette Routhier

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.
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Rough sketch by de Tocqueville of observations in Michigan.

 

 

 

 

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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.
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Display Case — Genesee Historical Archives on comments by Alexis de Tocqueville upon visiting Michigan in 1831-32.