All posts by Vera Anderson

Bicentennial of the University of Michigan

 


200 Years of The Leaders and Best:

University of Michigan Bicentennial


 

 

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The year was 1817. The United States itself had not existed for very long, and Michigan was not yet a state but still a frontier territory.   Detroit was a long way from being the world class city it would become.

Flint, Dearborn, and Ann Arbor would not be established until somewhat later. Yet, even then, people in Michigan Territory had big ideas about public education.

Governor Lewis Cass, Michigan

On August 26 of 1817, territorial governor Lewis Cass and local judges drew up the initial charter for what was originally called The Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania. “Catholepistemiad” being a word coined by Judge Augustus Woodward, after whom the main north-south road in Metro Detroit is named.

He intended the word to mean “a school of universal science.” The original proposed name was soon simplified to The University of Michigan.

In the early years in Detroit, the U of M was not really what we would now think of as a college or university.   It was something more like an advanced high school or preparatory school.

Fast forward 20 years to 1837.   By then, Michigan had become a state and the population was growing.   Therefore, there was more of a need for public education at all levels.

Among the many towns and cities being established in the state at that time was Ann Arbor, in the county just west of Wayne County where Detroit is.

A forty acre, square shaped plot of land in Ann Arbor was acquired and the first few buildings of what would eventually become a world class university were built.   The Reverend Henry Colclazer was appointed in 1837 as the first University of Michigan Librarian.

In 1841, the first college level students began their studies at the Ann Arbor campus. Four years later, twelve men formed the first graduating class of the University of Michigan.

The School of Literature, Sciences and Arts (LSA) was the first specific U of M college or school to be established.   As the rest of the 1800s progressed, other schools and colleges were added, such as Engineering, Medicine, Law, and of course Library Science.

Samuel Codes Watson

As has unfortunately been the case in American society generally, the University was slow to integrate on the basis of race and gender. Samuel Codes Watson was the first known African-American student at the University in 1853.

First Woman to Graduate From Medical School First woman to graduate from University of Michigan Medical School — Madelon Louisa Stockwell

 

 

 

In 1870, Madelon Stockwell became the first woman student at Michigan.

Image: Available online in Bentley Image Bank and in Ann Arbor, Michigan photograph collection, Bentley Historical Library, Ann Arbor in the 1870s.

 

 

 

 

By the 1860s, many of the extracurricular activities that are now such a big part of University life had been or were being established. Greek letter societies had existed almost from the beginning of the Ann Arbor campus.

The first of today’s intercollegiate sports teams, the Wolverines baseball team, began play in 1866.

The following year, the familiar University colors of maize and blue were first used.

Michigan Wolverines football team, 1883
Michigan Wolverines Football Team, 1894.

In 1879, the Michigan football team played and won its first game.

 

 

At that point, the American version of the game had not yet fully evolved and what was played then was more like today’s game of rugby.

Michigan Wolverines Football Team, 1897.

As history moved forward from the 1800s into the 1900s, the Ann Arbor campus continued to grow and expand far beyond the original 40 acre “Diag” area, taking over larger and larger parts of Ann Arbor.

Michigan Wolverines Football Team, 1902.

Eventually there would be four distinct “campuses” in Ann Arbor, first  being the original campus, another being the Medical Center.

The North Campus first began to be built in the 1950s and has grown over the years.

University of Michigan Stadium, May 2011 Photo by Corey Seeman
Sign at University of Michigan Stadium. Photo by Corey Seeman, 2009.

Finally, there is the South,  or Athletic campus, where the University sports venues including Michigan Stadium (The Big House) are located.

 

 Photo by Corey Seeman, Director, UM Business Library
University of Michigan Football Stadium. — Photo by Corey Seeman, 2011.

University of Michigan Alumni Field, Ann Arbor, Michigan
University of Michigan Women’s Softball Coach Carol Huchins.

Another favorite sports venue on the Ann Arbor campus is Alumni Field, where Coach Carol Hutchins leads the top ranked Wolverine women’s softball team.

 

Wondering  about our campus here in Flint?

 

As Michigan’s population grew along with the demand for higher education, it was proposed that the University open additional campuses outside of Ann Arbor.

Charles Stewart Mott

Flint businessman, Charles Stewart Mott, offered a large sum of his fortune to the University for the purpose of starting a campus here.

Others joined him in the effort, and in the fall of 1956 the first students arrived to attend classes at what was originally called The University of Michigan-Flint College.

Later, the word “College” was dropped from the name; we were officially the University of Michigan-Flint

 

The Dearborn campus opened in 1959.

The University still maintains a presence in the city where it originated 200 years ago, in the form of the Detroit Center, located on the street named after one of the University’s founders, Woodward Avenue.

From a dream in the minds of ambitious frontier residents, the University of Michigan has grown over two centuries into one of the leading institutions of higher education in the United States and the world.

The bicentennial motto is a very fitting description of this great University, and it echoes the refrain of the school’s famous fight song:  The University of Michigan…Always Leading, Forever Valiant.

GO BLUE!!

By:   Vanessa Prygoski

Annie Szuch Retires after 40 Years of Library Service


Annie Closes a Door on a Library Era

While she Opens a Door into her Future!


Annie Szuch
Beth Annie Szuch, retirement celebration, January 6, 2017.

For those of whose lives have formed part of the history of the Thompson Library, an era of monumental changes has ended.

Beth Annie Szuch, the last of our librarians who have been here since the 70s, has retired.

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Beth Annie Szuch. Librarian, Thompson Library, University of Michigan-Flint.

In a brief ceremony held in the Library on Friday (January 6, 2017), Laura Friesen and Becky Waller recited some of Annie’s accomplishments during her years working in the library.

The talking was followed by the eating, with a fantastic buffet enjoyed by librarians, library staff and several invited guests with close ties to Annie and her work within the Library and the Biology Department.  During the entire event, there was a lot of reminiscing, with plenty of old stories told (some familiar, some new to several), memories shared, happy moments relived, a few tears, and lots of laughter.

Annie was accompanied to the gathering by her husband, Ernie Szuch (professor of Biology, retired).

As the Guest of Honor, Annie had the opportunity to visit with old friends and colleagues, even those no longer working at UM-Flint — such as her former supervisor and friend, Dave Hart (retired), Gary Pace from Biology (retired) along with his wife, Colleen, and Karen Arthur from Human Resources, just to name a few of those that attended.

Annie’s association with the University of Michigan-Flint goes way back.   A native of the area, her father graduated from UM-Flint with a teaching degree.  Years later, Annie followed in her father’s footsteps and graduated from UM-Flint, but with a degree in biology.

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Retirement celebration for Annie Szuch, January 6, 2017.

It was during her undergrad years that Annie met fellow student and biology major, Ernie Szuch. The rest is history.

After they married, Ernie went on to get his graduate degree in biology, eventually returning to teach on our campus, becoming a respected fixture of UM-Flint until his own recent retirement.

Annie chose a different path.   She continued her education by obtaining her master’s degree in Library Science from UM-Ann Arbor.

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UM-Flint Libraray in the Mott Memorial Building (1970s).

Annie began working at Thompson Library in 1977, where she was assigned to work with Ingrid in Technical Services.

Working in serials section of Tech Services, Annie processed the incoming journal issues and sent older volumes to the bindery, maintained journals on-shelf and updated the card catalog.

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University of Michigan-Flint Library, 5th floor, CROB, mid 1980s.

Over the years, Annie has progressed through the ranks, moving on to handling new book orders, donated books, and maintaining the index of materials owned by the Library through updating the (at that time) new online database, MIRLYN as our cataloger.

Plus, of course, Annie also worked front-and-center as a Reference Librarian, Biology Department Library Liaison, and teaching librarian.

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Construction of the Thompson Library, which opened October 1994.
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Thompson Library, 3rd floor carrels overlooking the Atrium.
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Thompson Library, north side.

Through all those decades of service,  Annie has seen a lot of changes.

From starting out in the UM-Flint library that shared space with Mott College at the Mott Memorial Building, to the vast, open area where the library remained for a couple decades on the 5th floor of the Classroom Office Building (fondly know to one and all as CROB, now dubbed French Hall in honor of our former Chancellor), to the brand new facility made specifically and exclusively to house the Thompson Library, Annie has seen it all.

No other librarian in current service can make that claim.

And thus ends an era.

Though Annie is leaving us, her life will continue to remain full and active.

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Smudge Szuch in the rafters at home during the holidays.

She will continue to share her magnificent log cabin home with her husband, Ernie, as well as several family members that happen to have 4 legs, a tail and fur — and purr!

 

We’ll miss hearing of the exploits of Annie’s cats, both living and living in memory, such as Two-Spot, Smudge, Petunia and Gracie.

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Annie at her favorite hobby.

Her cats will be by her side when she enjoys some of her favorite hobbies, such as spinning wool into yarn, then using the yarn she created to knit beautiful and warm items of clothing.

 

Annie has developed a great deal of expertise in this particular hobby, and has taught both spinning and knitting to others.

Annies Cane
Annie’s cane, uniquely personalized!

Annie2Knowing Annie’s fondness for her knitting projects and anything related to yarn,  her colleagues at the Thompson Library gave Annie a gift certificate to her favorite yarn shop, Heritage Spinning and Weaving of  Lake Orion, where Annie has been known to teach a class or two as well.

Annie tells us she will be using her gift certificate to purchase a new 8-shaft loom to replace her old 4-shaft loom.  The old loom will likely become available if anyone is interested in learning how to use one.  (And of course,  Annie can even teach you HOW to use a loom.  She also teaches knitting, both beginner and advanced, as well.)

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Retirement Celebration for Annie Szuch, Thomposon Library, 2017.

Not to be outdone,  Gary Pace (retired UM-Flint associate professor of biology) and his wife, Colleen gifted Annie with a framed photograph of herself and Ernie — underwater, snorkeling in the clear, blue ocean.

It’s an incredible keepsake of just one of the many adventures that Annie and Ernie have shared over the years, including incredible memories of summers spent on expeditions from the Caribbean  to the Smokey Mountains to the great forests of the north.  Now they have a photo that captures an amazing moment of their many  adventures together.

We all enjoyed the party, but it had a bitter-sweet overtone for everyone there, knowing that we were celebrating a life well lived, but that the course of that life would no longer include Annie’s bright and smiling face joining us daily — or boxes of donuts from the Davison bakery.

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Annie Szuch retirement celebration, Thompson Library, 1-6-17.

 

Annie, we are going to miss you.

But we join together in wishing you all happiness and all possible joy in your retirement.

 

FramedFlowers

May the new life you now begin be as  wonderful  —  and as memorable     —    as the one you have left as your legacy.



—– OPEN ALL NIGHT! —– Extended Hours at Thompson Library Start December 12, 2016.

 Finals are approaching.   We’re here to help.

Thompson Library  will be  OPEN  for  90  Consecutive Hours during Study Week!


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A reminder from the Library! Help for study stress during the Thompson Library 24 hour study days.
Studying at Thompson LibraryNeed a place to study on campus throughout the day and night?

The Frances Willson Thompson Library will open at 8 am on Monday, December 12th and will remain open  until 2am on Friday, December 16th.

Studying for Final Exams at Thompson Library

That’s right     —-    the library will remain open 24 hours Monday, Tuesday and Wed, not closing again until 2am on Friday, December 16th this year.

Thompson Library Atrium

This winter, in conjunction with and through the assistance of Student Government as well  as the generosity of volunteers within the library staff, Thompson Library will adjust its hours of operation, extending the time we are open.

 

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There will be several mini-events in the library throughout the 24 hour schedule to support students stressed by preparing for finals.

Student Life hands out breakfast sandwiches, bagels, beverages and more!

 

 

Student Government is providing light refreshments early in the evening.

Therapy Dogs visit University of Michigan-Flint campus. (2015)

 

 

 

Therapy Dogs will again be visiting Thompson Library this year to assist students dealing with Finals stress.  Come play with the dogs!  They’ll be here on Thursday (December 15th) from noon to 2 pm.

Detailed coloring books and pencils to help relieve stress.

Coloring books, those charming pages with intricate designs, will be available along with coloring pencils to help take your mind off studying for a few minutes.

 

Students needing to study for exams, or to work on that final paper,  are welcome during our extended hours at Thompson Library throughout the week.

Come and take advantage of these special extended hours to do all that last-minute cramming and put the final touches on your project this week.

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Silent Study Room Now Available

Thompson Library has over 900 chairs at carrels, tables and several study rooms in a quiet atmosphere.

Therapy Dogs visit Thompson Library

 

 

 

Study rooms can be reserved online. From the online list, select your preferred date, time and room, then pick up the key at the Circulation Desk when you arrive.  Reserve online and be guaranteed a group study space!

Reservation form online for Thompson Library study rooms!

 

 

Bring your coffee, your books and (if you want) your laptops – whatever you need to do your research and studying in a quiet, serene location conducive to scholarly contemplation.

Therapy Dogs visit Thompson Library

 

Campus-wide  Wi-Fi and the ITS computer lab machines and printers (on all 3 floors of the Library) are available.

Or check out a laptop using your library card (UMID) for use inside the library.

There are over 70 computers (including a few Macs) in the ITS lab located within the library (divided among all 3 floors).

One of the ITS Lab Papercut Print Queue Printer in Thompson Library

Additionally, ITS supplies the Library with 3 printer/copier machines (one on each floor) plus one color printer (3rd floor) for your convenience.  All printers are connected to the campus-wide print-queue via the Papercut system.

Control screen on the ITS Lab printer in Thompson Library.

Send your document to the printer from any ITS computer lab machine.  The document is saved in your personal print queue; no one else can see or print it.  Then retrieve your document at ANY ITS computer lab printer by sliding your UMID card to pull up YOUR list of items sent to printer.  Select the document you want now, hit print button.  It’s that easy.

You can even send documents to the print queue from your laptop via the campus WiFi system.  (See ITS website for instructions.)

Use the phones (next to printers) in Thompson Library to make free inter-campus calls. Call the ITS HelpDesk for assistance with computers, computer programs or printers. They’ll even help you print from a laptop!

Need technical assistance?   ITS has a telephone on the wall next to the printers with their 5 digit inter-campus number clearly posted.  Give them a call and they can walk you through any computer, software or printer difficulties.

Therapy Dogs visit Thompson Library

 

 

 

 

Need to charge your electronics?   There are many outlet plugs (including under each of the carrels along the edge of the room) for powering devices.

Be sure NOT to leave electronic devices unattended.  Not all elves have good intentions.  (Some are elves of mischief — and theft.)

 

Laptops available for checkout! Ask at Circulation Desk. Use your library card (UMIC) to check out a laptop. In-library use, only.
  • Laptops are available to checkout for use within the library.

 

  • VHS and DVD players are available in each of the Study Rooms.

 

  • Study Rooms can be reserved online (check the UM-Flint Thompson Library website) for study groups.
Midnight at the oasis — the Reference Desk. Vera Anderson and Vince Prygoski working the post-midnight hours in the Library.

Plus there are Reference Librarians on hand to help you find and use the research materials provided by the library, both in print and online.

 

 

DVDs, VHS tapes, Music CDs — plus books and ebooks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thompson Library provides access to:

  • Over 250,000 books shelved in our building and an additional 500,000 ebooks online (available to borrow just like the print books, but readable as full text online).
  • A collection of over 4,000 music CDs and videos in DVD format.
  • Over 1,000 databases offering indexes to scholarly journals and data sets, many full text online.

… and so much more!

 

And — as always  — our librarians and staff will be available to assist students with their research needs.

 

 


—    HOURS  OF  OPERATION    —

 

Through the end of December 2016, Thompson Library will be open during the following hours:

 

                Monday (12th)  —  Thursday (15th):   Open 24 hours

      Friday (16th) :                                                   Close at 2am.

                Friday (16th) :                                                   8  am     to  10 pm

                Saturday :                                                           10  am    to  10 pm   

      Sunday:                                                                12 noon to 12 midnight

                Monday (19th)  —  Tuesday (20th):     8 am to    2 am

      Wednesday (21st):                                        8 am to 12 midnight

      Thursday (22nd):                                            8 am  to   6 pm

                Friday (23rd):                                                    8 am to    6 pm

                Saturday (24th)  —    Begin  Winter  Intersession —  CLOSED 

 

HAPPY  NEW  YEAR!

Winter Semester Begins  —  January 3, 2017

Winter Hours in Effect for 2017

(See:   Library Hours for calendar of hours through April 2017)


Need some holiday entertainment???

 

Should you need something enticing, enlightening or stimulating, or just plain FUN to read during this long winter break — remember your library has a large paperback  collection of “good reads,” at the bottom of the stairs on the 1st floor (just beyond the Oversized books), an extensive literature collection (see the call items in call number PS on the 1st floor near the windows) as well as plenty of best sellers and topically or timely fascinating books in our Browsing Collection.

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The semester is almost over.

Let’s go to the Library!

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Thompson Library Hosts Organ Donor Drive

 

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There is a desperate need for people to registered as organ donors upon their death to help save  lives of those who through injury, birth defects, or disease are in desperate need of replacement organs.

 

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Informing the public of the facts of organ donation and getting as many people as possible to register as organ donors is vital.

 

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Once again, as we have for the past 5 years, University of Michigan-Flint’s Thompson Library hosted an Organ Donor event in October in conjunction with the UM-Flint Student Nurses Association.

 

Libraries all across the State of Michigan participated in the event, raising awareness and signing up thousands of new donors while simultaneously enlightening thousands more about the need for organ donors.

The results of the 2016 organ donor drive are as follows:

University of Michigan-Flint, Thompson Library

     Hours booth was open:                                                 8

     New Donors registered:                                             43

     Visitors already registered as donors:             288

     People asking for information:                                 83

How does this compare with UM-Flint’s participation in years past?   Here’s how it breaks down:

Year                       New Donors Registered

2016                                       43

2015                                       32

2014                                       42

2013                                       48

2012                                       67

2011                                       77

2010                                       72

Volunteers manning the Thompson Library organ donor registration table.

Numbers may have dropped over earlier years, but overall University of Michigan-Flint continues to have good participation and regularly increases the number of Michigan citizens who are now on the organ donor list.

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How do we compare to other libraries over the years?  Here’s the breakdown:

Year             All Libraries       New Flint Donors          Flint Donors%

2010                        5                                    72                                   32.0%

2011                      10                                  77                                    18.6%

2012                      29                                  67                                       9.4%

2013                      38                                  48                                       8.4%

2014                      57                                  42                                       7.9%

2015                      60                                  32                                       7.2%

2016                      74                                  43                                       7.0%

 

Statewide, there were 154 participating organizations, with 74 staffed organ donor registration tables and 80 organ donor informational displays.

 

2016 Statistics — State of Michigan

New Donors registered:                                                          597

Visitors already registered as donors:                        2,558

Potential Donors asking for information:                  1,907

Total visitors to booth:                                                         4,872

Hours booth was open:                                                           823

Volunteers manning the Thompson Library organ donor registration table.

In all, UM-Flint contributed about 7% of the total people who registered as organ donors during the one-day drive this year.

Well done, University of Michigan-Flint people!

For more information, see:

Michigan Libraries for Life



Save

“Where’s Your Fiction?”

 


Just want to kick back and read a good book this weekend?

THOMPSON  LIBRARY  CAN  HELP!


 

Student, faculty, or staff — you are part of the University of Michigan.  You stand among the Leaders and the Best.   You hold yourself to a higher standard.  You are a scholar in the best sense of that word.   You regularly use the library to research topics.  You do your due diligence — digging for facts and verifying your data.

But every now and then, you’d just like to escape into another place, a place populated with cowboys, Jedi warriors, dashing and romantic heroes, colorful pirates, brilliant compassionate doctors or mysterious strangers.

You know the UM library is a great source for facts, figures and academic articles.  But this weekend, you just want a fun read to kick back with, something that will let you get away from the stress of higher education and slip into an exciting world far from your daily existence.  A little creative escapism.

You just want a good book to read over the weekend ...

Good news!   We CAN help!

That’s right.

Thompson Library actually has some great reads, good books just for you to  jump in and enjoy as plain old escapist reading.

Where can you find a fun read in the library?

LOTS of places!

Where exactly will depend largely on what type of item you want.

 

MAIN  COLLECTION:

For instance on the first floor of the library (near the windows in the Atrium), books indexed in the call number “PS” section contain our collection of literature.

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It’s a vast and varied collection ranging from the great classics to works of fiction in nearly every genre imaginable.

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There are even several fiction paperbacks that are included in the literature section of  the Main Collection, PS call number section.

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FIND  a  BOOK  in the MAIN COLLECTION by  TITLE  or  AUTHOR:

MIRLYLN online catalog — search page — click to enlarge

Check the MIRLYN library catalog online for your favorite author — or even for a title you’d like to read.  It may already be in the PS section of the library collection.  Find the call number and locate the book on shelf.  Use your UMID to check it out.

 

MIRLYN online catalog — Results page — click to enlarge

 

 

That’s right.

The library will loan you — for free! — good books to enjoy reading  just for fun.

 

 

PAPERBACK  BOOKS:

Speaking of paperback books, did you know that Thompson Library has an extensive collection of paperback books, just for the purpose of finding a good read for a quiet afternoon (or before bedtime)?

The Paperback collection is located on the  1st floor near the Oversized Books and Microfilm cabinets.

Paperback Collection Shelves — 1st floor — click to enlarge

 

They’re directly in front of the elevator when you step off on the 1st floor.  Just keep walking past the row of Oversized books and you’ll find a reader’s delight of paperbacks.

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Paperbacks are organized by genre, so whether you like         Science FictionFantasyRomance, Mystery,    Suspense or Historical Fiction,  you’re likely to find something you’ll enjoy reading.

The Paperback collection is not cataloged in MIRLYN, so it’s “browse the shelves,” only to locate a book you’d like to borrow.  But they’re easily scanned with titles clearly visible on the spine of the books  — and we have many to choose from on the shelves.

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Any book on the Paperback Collection shelves can be checked out for 3 weeks, with the option to renew for an additional 3 weeks.

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CURRENTLY POPULAR “BEST SELLER LIST” BOOKS:

 

Or perhaps you want to read a book that is currently (or was recently) on the Best Seller’s list?

Browsing Collection — FICTION (click to enlarge)

 

Our Browsing Collection should help you out!  It contains best sellers of a variety of genres.

Browsing Collection — NON-FICTION (click to enlarge)

Located on the 3rd floor (near the Circulation Desk and close to the entrance to the Library), the shelves of the Browsing Collection have books from best seller’s lists in fiction, books of local interest (including books written by local authors) and best selling books on non-fiction.

 

 

CHILDREN’S  BOOKS:

We even have an extensive collection of Children’s Literature in our library which you may borrow.

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Children’s Literature Collection — click to enlarge

We maintain a quality collection of children’s books for use and education of our future elementary school teachers currently attending our School of Education — but any student, staff or faculty from UM-Flint can check them out.

Children’s Literature Collection — click to enlarge

So if you want a good read for the children in your family, we can help with those books, too.

All items within the children’s literature genre are indexed and searchable in the MIRLYN online library catalog.

Find the call number in MIRLYN and — if you need help — ask one of our Reference Librarians to assist you in locating the book on shelf.

 

MOVIES & MUSIC:

 

VIDEOS

For those who prefer to watch movies rather than read, we have a nice little collection of popular films in several formats, from VHS to DVD to BlueRay to streaming online via subscription service databases

ALEXANDER STREET PRESS      and       KANOPY.

(See list of databases on Thompson Library website to access any of these resources — authentication with UM-Flint credentials required to view any subscription item online.)

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img_3744img_3750img_3749 click to enlarge any image

 

Any item the library owns — including videos and music — can be found by using the MIRLYN library catalog online.  Want to limit results to ONLY videos and music?  Switching the drop-down box for our various collections to limit results to “Media.”

MIRLYN will provide the call number, which can be given to the clerks at the Circulation Desk (where you check out books) to retrieve.  Note that all media items have a 1 week check out loan period.

 

MUSIC

Want to listen to some music?   We have that, too!

We have an extensive collection of music from classical to swing to rock to jazz — historic or contemporary, we have it!

The music CD collection is near the video collection, and as with everything else in the library, can be found using the library catalog.

Music CD Collection — click to enlarge

 

NEED HELP?

Having trouble finding something that interests you?

Ask a Reference Librarian for help.

They can help you find anything we have in the library and beyond,  and will probably be happy to discuss their favorite books or videos with you.

Reference Librarians like to read for fun, too!

Reference Desk — Thompson Library — University of Michigan-Flint (click to enlarge)

 

No matter what you enjoy reading or viewing, whether doing scholarly research, or just want something to kick back with for a leisurely afternoon, you’ll find it at Thompson Library.



Big Brothers in Flint — Ryder Papers Now Available in Archives

 


Historical Information on Flint’s Big Brothers Organization


 

In 2015, Robert Ryder of Reston, Virginia, donated the papers of his late father, Joseph T. Ryder (1906-1979) to our University of Michigan-Flint Genesee Historical Collections Center.

These papers have been processed and are now available for researchers to access on-site.

Joe Ryder (1978)
Joe Ryder (1978) (Click to enlarge any photograph)

Who was Joe Ryder?   Joe was the person largely responsible for Flint, Michigan having a vibrant and successful Big Brother program.

Ryder came from the Toledo area to Flint in 1944 to direct the Flint Youth Bureau, a new program supported by the C. S. Mott Foundation.

For the next 35 years, he led the organization and its successor, Big Brother of Greater Flint, to provide guidance to underprivileged boys who typically were delinquent or had no father at home.

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Flint Youth Bureau winter activity at the old Sugarbush, a favorite wintertime destination.

The collection provides ample documentation on the organization’s history, as well as his involvement in community education seminars held around the U.S., and on the national organization of Big Brothers. 

(Click to enlarge any photo)

 

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C.S. Mott, Harlow (Red) Curtice, and other automotive pioneers at the Cultural Center about 1958.

If you would like to learn more about Mr. Ryder and his association with the beginning of Flint’s Big Brothers organization, please contact our Archivist, Paul Gifford.

Better still, drop in and visit Paul at the Genesee Historical Archives to learn more about Mr. Ryder and other people and events which had an impact on our local, state and national development.

Genesee Historical Archives is located in the Frances Willson Thomopson Libray building, 2nd floor corridor (near the tube to UPAV).

Contact information and hours of operation for the Archive are available on the Thompson Library website at:

http://libguides.umflint.edu/friendly.php?s=library

 

Information on the Archive’s finding aids and digital collections may be found at:

https://www.umflint.edu/archives/archives



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What Can you Check Out at the Library?



Did you know you could check this out at the library?


Use your MCard (UMID) at the Library!

In addition to being your ID at UM, it’s also your library card.  (Turn it over and see the barcode on the back, along with your library card number.  It should begin with 59015—

But WHAT can you get with a library card these days?

Sure, you can use the online library catalog (MIRLYN) to find books in our main collection to check out.   There are over a quarter of a million books currently on-shelf in Thompson Library you can check out. (Plus all those books in the Ann Arbor campus libraries, too.)

But did you know you can also use your library card to check out these items from the library?

 

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Headphones — check out headphones at the library. Use on any computer. In-library use, only.

Listen to music or audio files on your computer without disturbing others.


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Graphing Calculators — Use for higher math functions, calculus, trigonometry, etc.

External Disc Drives – Use to play DVDs or CDs on computers without an internal disc drive (i.e. the ITS machines)


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Laptop Computers — Available to use in library. Check out with your library card (MCard).


Help with English Language —                                                                                  (English as Second Language assistance)img_3628An entire collection of materials to help non-native English speakers improve their communication skills in English.

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Thompson Library has a small but growing collection of materials to help those learning English as a second language.


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Children’s literature — Thompson Library has an extensive collection of children’s literature in support of UM-Flint’s School of Education.  Standard loan period applies to all books in the Children’s Literature.

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From Thompson Library’s collection of children’s literature.

Children’s Literature collection is currently housed on the 3rd floor of the Thompson Library.  If you need assistance locating the materials, please ask at the Information Desk near the entrance.


Media Collection —

  • Movies (both educational and entertainment)
  • Music (all genres)

img_3624We have Movies & Music on shelves in the library (3rd floor).

We have movies in both VHS and DVD formats.  (Mostly DVD.)

We have non-fiction, educational videos across a wide variety of fields, from Business to Medicine to Shakespeare and more.

We have popular movies, such as Patriot Games, Forest Gump, Marathon Man, Braveheart, Harry Potter, Paint Your Wagon — and many more.

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We have music CDs on shelf — LOTS of music CDs on shelf!  Plus a wide variety of music (both vocals and instrumentals).

All available to check out from the library.

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Browsing Collection —

We also have current and recent best sellers available for yoreading pleasure in our Browsing Collection (3rd floor).

img_3629Browsing Collection 1

Browsilng Collection Local Interest 2

 


Special Collections —

We frequently put out special collections of books to share current interest or events with everyone.

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Atlas Collection —

Plus we have other items of interest nearby as well, such as the current newspapers shelf, and the Atlas Collection of maps.

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Study Rooms —

Did you know you can check out a Study Room?

Use the online software from the Thompson Library website to reserve a Study Room.  Then pick up the key to the room at Circulation using your library card (UMID) to check it out.

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Lockers —

We even have small lockers to store you things while you’re in the library.   (They cost a quarter — and are emptied out regularly, so there should be one waiting for you when you need it.)

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Blue Books, Scantrons & Pencils —

And if you need Blue Books or Scantrons for an upcoming test in your class, we usually have those available, too.  (Ask at the Circulation Desk.)   Plus pencils — everyone needs pencils.  All available for you right at the Library.

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The Library is the best place to find reliable, scholarly information.

The Library is absolutely the best place to do your research.

But the Library is so much more than that.

Come in and walk through your library.

You’ll be amazed at what you can find.

AND …   At what you can check out!

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Banned Books Week, September 25 – October 1, 2016 — Suggested Reading Lists

 


Be Subversive!

Read a Banned Book!


You are an iconoclast.

You think and reason for yourself.

You are a diploma-toting member of the intelligentsia.   (Or will be soon, if you have anything to say about it.   And you do!)

You don’t rely on Google to tell you what to think or what to do.

You understand due diligence.

You do your research.

You are informed.

You are knowledgeable.

You are a candle of wisdom shining in a dark world.

You are subversive.

You …

READ!

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Visit the Thompson Library BANNED BOOK display to see several books in our collection that have been banned.

Books they don’t want you to read.

But you will.

Because it’s your right!

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Read a Banned Book today!

 

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(Click image to enlarge.)

img_3616See the Banned Book Display in the Thompson Library, UM-Flint.

Located on the 3rd floor.  (Ask at Information Desk for directions.)

 


 

Want to read more about Banned Book Week?

Check out the American Libraries Association website.

 



 

 

Patriots & Peacemakers; Serving their Nation, and the World


Arab Americans

In Service to Our Country

Patriots  –  Peace Makers  –  Diplomats


 

img_3576fullsizeEarly in September, a new and thought-provoking walk-though display was assembled on the 3rd floor of the Thompson Library near the main entrance.

(Click on any photo to enlarge)

The display addresses what one person interviewed described as  the responsibility to give back to your nation.   Various categories of service are listed, all that serve in one aspect or the other as either:   Patriot, Peace Maker, or Diplomat.

Brought to us by the Arab American National Museum, this traveling img_3366-002display will be available to experience in the University of Michigan-Flint Thompson Library through December 2016.

The display highlights the contribution of Arab Americans in service to their country from the 1800’s to present day.

img_3378First on the list of information available to the viewer as one walks through the display is a simple but perhaps not well known fact; Arab Americans are not a small nor homogeneous group of tight-knit people with an identical ethnicity.

They derive from a very diverse popularion with widely disparate backgrounds, img_3567heritages, customs and religions coming from a large area of the globe that consists of many countries and regions.   The one thing they have in common is that they all have roots in that geographic area which spans the lands  identified as the Middle East and across the length of northern Africa.

img_3418-002Whether they are men or women, Muslims or Christians, old or img_3559young, these Americans have a long history of service to their country.

 

img_3410As you walk through the display, you’ll see images of men and women that served in various branches of the United States armed forces.

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You can read stories of men and women who served in World War I (nearly 14,000), World War II (over 15,000) and other engagements — many serving with distinction and honors.

Too many gave their country the last, full measure of devotion.

 

You can read about Rear Admiral Faye Glenn Abdellah, who also img_3404served as Deputy Surgeon General (1949 – 1989) — the first nurse and the first woman to hold that position.  Descending from both Algerian and Scottish heritage, her theories revolutionized nursing care, altering it from the standard disease-centered care to an improved  patient-centered approach.

You can read of the many other officers and soldiers (both men and img_3569women) who served the US military along with where and how they served, including the 3,500 Arab Americans currently serving their country today.

(Click on any image to enlarge.)

 

img_3563After the infamy that was 9/11, many of these patriots found their loyalties questioned, and as a result the Association of Patriotic Arab Americans in the Military (APAAM) formed to offer support to Americans who, through no other reason than their ethnic origins, came under special scrutiny.

It was one of the first formal organizations for active and veteran img_3561Arab American service members, people who — by their beliefs and record of service to their nation — consider themselves Patriots.

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Being a patriot does not prevent a person from also being a Peace Maker, however.  As you walk through the fascinating display, you’ll img_3571see the record of many Arab Americans who served their nation in an entirely different way, through the Peace Corps.

img_3564The Peace Corps was established in 1961 by President John F. Kennedy to promote world peace and provide an international public service.  It is a volunteer organization which helps communities around the world understand U.S. culture while helping Americans understand the cultures of other groups and nations.

img_3572From the beginning days of the Peace Corps, Arab Americans have served; people such as Donna Shalala (1962), Bill Aossey and Janet Ghattas (1963), and many others have contributed to the success of the Peace Corps program.

The list of volunteers includes many who had previously served in the United States military, such as Antoinette Byda Peters Day (US Army, 1966 – 1970; Peace Corps, 2007 – 2009), proving that Arab Americans can be both Patriots AND Peace Makers within their lives, contributing both service to their country and service to their fellow man on behalf of their country.

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Another way many Arab Americans have combined these two aspects into their lives has been service in the U. S. Diplomatic Corps, many serving in positions in countries around the globe since World War II and in even greater numbers within the past 30 years.

img_3454As you wander through the expansive display, you’ll see interesting artifacts, watch video clips, listen to audio descriptions, and even get a chance to learn a few words in other languages.

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The historical information is informative, and photos are striking, and it is well worth the time to visit and meander through the display.

img_3389But alas, it is only on loan to the University of Michigan-Flint from the Arab American National Museum for a limited time.

We urge you to take advantage of this fascinating and informative display while it is available to our campus.

img_3388To visit the display, enter the Thompson Library  (University of Michigan-Flint) on the 3rd floor.

The display is easily seen from the entrance, directly behind the INFORMATION DESK.

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img_3402(Click on any image to enlarge.)

 

 

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(Click on any photo to enlarge!)

 

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(Click on any photo to enlarge!)

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Shhhhhh …. !!! The Library Added a QUIET Room!

 


Need a QUIET place to study?

The Library Has It!


 

You need to review for your upcoming Econ quiz.  Or maybe you’re working on that English paper that’s due next week.  Study at home, with all those people demanding your time and attention?  Nope.  At the dorm, with everyone involved in their own lives?  Impossible!

Construction116Upon careful consideration of your options, you make the wise choice.  The library!

The tables in the Atrium have plenty of light from the 3 story windows, and that lovely pastoral view of the Flint river and U-M Flint, Andrea Yingervast open lawns …

So relaxing.

It’s a great place to study in peace and quiet.

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Our thanks go to this group of students studying diligently at a table in the library for permission to use their image. UM-Flint has the greatest students!

Unfortunately, about a hundred other students had the same idea.

And with the incredible acoustics in the Atrium, the subtle background sounds start gnawing on your nerves.

Then a large group comes in and sits at the table next to you.  And they start whispering.  It’s not that bad.  You can ignore them and immerse yourself in studying.

img_3648A girl giggles.  Someone drops a book.  Somewhere someone is talking on their phone.   You hear the faint sound of music wafting down from the upper level carrels.  Several nearby students start talking about where to go for dinner, what clothes to wear and …

You are about ready to explode!

All you need is a room where you can get some peace and quiet and get your work done.  Why can’t that place be the library?!!!

What you need is a quiet study room.

And Thompson Library has it.  

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The Silent Study Room opened early in September, just for you — the img_3618student who needs a quiet, peaceful place to study.

img_3047There are no computers, no TVs, no audio players — just very comfortable furniture, good lighting — and silence.

No reservations needed.

If you need help finding the Silent Study img_3043Room, just ask any library staff (check at the Information Desk near the entrance).

img_3044They’ll be happy to point out the location for you.

(Click any image to enlarge.)

 

The Rules for using the Silent Study Room?

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NO talking!img_3062

 

 

 

NO groups.

NO noise.

Break those rules and be asked to leave.

This room is exclusively for you, the student who needs quiet.

And wants a good grade on that upcoming quiz.

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Silent Study Room.

Across from the Circulation Desk on the west wall, 3rd floor.

Room 319,  Thompson Library.

Just for you.

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